Culloden Moor, Highland


Battlefield – Culloden Moor
c.1910
Publisher: “M D & Co Ltd, Glasgow”

Google Street View (approximate).

The course of British, European and world history was changed at Culloden on 16 April 1746. A ferocious war had come to Scotland, dividing families and setting clan against clan. It was here that the Jacobite army took their last stand to reclaim the thrones of Britain from the Hanoverians for a Stuart king. The Jacobites fought to restore the exiled James VIII as king and were led by Prince Charles Edward Stuart, James’s son; George II’s government army (led by the Duke of Cumberland, George’s son) was equally determined to stop this happening.
National Trust for Scotland

Although a road was built across the battlefield in 1835, attempts have been made by the National Trust for Scotland to restore the parts of the site in their care to how they would have appeared to participants in the battle. Archaeological investigations, including the use of metal detectors to recover musket balls and other battlefield debris, have pinpointed the spots where the heaviest fighting took place. It seems that the Jacobites were using muskets in greater numbers than was first thought, while the recovery of heavy iron shell fragments shows that the government army fired mortars in a bid to halt the onrushing Jacobites.
. . .
This 20-foot-high memorial cairn was erected by Duncan Forbes in 1881. Forbes was the owner of Culloden House (now a luxury hotel), which had been in the hands of his family since the 17th century, and was the descendant of a key figure on the government side in 1746.

History Extra

On Culloden Moor on April 16 1746 arguably the last Scottish army sought to restore Prince Charles’ father James to a multi-kingdom monarchy more aligned to European politics than colonial struggle. Forget any idea of Highland clans against British regiments. The Jacobites were heavily armed with muskets and formed into conventional regiments. They were drilled according to French conventions and some British army practice and fought next to Franco-Irish and Scoto-French allies. They possessed numerous artillery pieces and fired more balls per man than the British.
The Conversation

Glen Coe, Scotland


Glencoe
Postmarked 1934
Publisher: Valentine

Google Street View.

Glen Coe is a glen of volcanic origins, in the Highlands of Scotland. . . . The main settlement is the village of Glencoe located at the foot of the glen. Glen Coe is regarded as the home of Scottish mountaineering and is popular with hillwalkers and climbers. On the 13 February 1692, in the aftermath of the Jacobite uprising of 1689, an incident known as the Massacre of Glencoe took place in the glen. Thirty-eight men from Clan MacDonald of Glencoe were killed by government forces who were billeted with them on the grounds that they had not been prompt in pledging allegiance to the new monarchs, William II and Mary II. The Glen is named after the River Coe which runs through it. The name of the river may predate the Gaelic language, as its meaning is not known. It is possible that the name stems from an individual personal name, Comhan.
Wikipedia.

Inverness, Highland


Inverness Castle from Ness Walk
c.1910
“Davidson’s Real Photographic Series”

Google Street View.

Inverness Castle (Scottish Gaelic: Caisteal Inbhir Nis) sits on a cliff overlooking the River Ness in Inverness, Scotland. The red sandstone structure, displaying an early castellated style, is the work of a few 19th-century architects. William Burn (1789–1870) designed the Sheriff Court, Joseph Mitchell (1803–1883) the bastioned enclosing walls, and Thomas Brown II (1806–c. 1872) the District Court, originally built as a prison. It is built on the site of an 11th-century defensive structure. Until 30 March 2020, it housed Inverness Sheriff Court: . . . The current Inverness Castle was built in 1836 on the site of the original. To improve the more recent castle, a gas, light and water system was installed.
Wikipedia.


The Ness from the Castle Hill, Inverness
Publisher: Valentine

Google Street View


Cathedral and Flora Macdonald’s Statue, Inverness
Dated 1914

Google Street View.

Monument to Flora Macdonald, Castle Hill, Inverness,” by Andrew Davidson (1841-1925). 1896-99. Bronze group, including the collie dog. The monument stands in front of the Sheriff Court, high on Castle Hill, Inverness, so that, as John Gifford says, Flora is shown gazing “down the Great Glen” (197) — the valley of the River Ness. Flora Macdonald was the young woman who helped Bonnie Prince Charlie escape from Scotland after the Jacobites were routed at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. According to the “Inverness City Trail,” the statue of the Jacobite heroine was paid for” by the generosity of “Captain J. Henderson MacDonald of Caskieben, and of the 78th Highlanders.” As well as an inscription of Flora Macdonald’s name in the granite pedestal, there is a bronze plaque, in the shape of a shield, with a quotation in both Gaelic and English.
Victorian Web