Stepping Stones, Jesmond Dene, Newcastle on Tyne, Tyne & Wear


Stepping Stones, Jesmond Dene, Newcastle-on-Tyne
Postmarked 1908
Publisher “B & D London”

Google Street VIew (approximate)

Jesmond Dene is the jewel in the crown of Newcastle’s parks and green spaces. The Dene is packed full of historic and natural features and masses of wildlife, flowers and ancient woodland for everyone to enjoy. The River Ouseburn was used to power the mills of the industrial revolution. You will find evidence of the area’s industrial heritage within the Dene today. By 1862 William Armstrong had purchased most of the Dene and had built his house (Jesmond Dene House) and transformed the dene into his private garden, creating waterfalls, a grotto and planting many exotic trees and shrubs. In 1883 Armstrong gifted his garden back to the people of Newcastle and it was officially opened to the public in 1884. . . . Jesmond Dene is an ancient woodland and of geological interest. The dominant tree species are English, with a mix of exotic species. Wildlife can be found in abundance – with otters, kingfishers and dippers known to have breeding sites on the river.
Urban Green, Newcastle

Turning left, we descend into a quarry which on a fine summer’s day is a veritable suntrap. The quarry, shown as Blaeberry Crags on earlier maps, was worked for sandstone which is of a very high quality and is said to have made grindstones which were shipped all over the world. Leaving the quarry by the lower path we can see on our left, high in the bankside a seam of coal – not of very high quality, but a reminder of the number of small drift mines once along the bank of the Ouseburn. From here we rejoin the Ouseburn and keeping to the left bank, pass North Lodge, with stepping stones directly in front, and continue to Jesmond Dene Waterfall with its bridge and ruined mill. The Waterfall, an awe-inspiring sight when in full spate, was constructed in the late 1800s by the then Lord Armstrong to provide a more picturesque view. Below it stands the old Water Mill, one of many mills which bordered the Ouseburn in years past.
Jesmond Dene

Council House, Birmingham


Council Chambers, Birmingham
Postmarked 1908

Birmingham City Council House in Birmingham, England, is the home of Birmingham City Council, and thus the seat of local government for the city. It provides office accommodation for both employed council officers, including the Chief Executive, and elected council members, plus the council chamber, Lord Mayor’s Suite, committee rooms and a large and ornate banqueting suite, complete with minstrel’s gallery. . . . In 1852, Birmingham Town Council had inherited the old Public Office on Moor Street, from their predecessors the Street Commissioners, which the council used as their meeting place. It soon became apparent that this building dating from 1807 was not adequate for the needs of the growing town (which became a city in 1889) and that larger premises would be needed. . . . A design competition was established and the council received 29 entries, which was disappointing in comparison to the 179 entries Sheffield and Birmingham received. However a decision was delayed by further financial difficulties. The council was then split over the Gothic entry by Martin & Chamberlain and the classical entry by Yeoville Thomason.

Thomason’s design was chosen; his design featured a central section with a huge hexastyle Corinthian order porte-cochere carrying a balcony with an arch and tympanum high above, flanked by piers and columns which in turn carried a large carved pediment. However, amendments to the art gallery entrance and clock tower were made. The clock and tower are known locally as “Big Brum”. Construction commenced on the building in 1874 when the first stone was laid by the then mayor Joseph Chamberlain. The building was completed in 1879 and cost £163,000 (equivalent to £16,940,000 in 2020). A debate was held to decide the name of the building: the options were The Municipal Hall, Council House and Guildhall. The Council House was extended almost immediately, in 1881–85. The architect was again Yeoville Thomason. This was a combined art gallery, museum, and the home of the corporation’s Gas Department, whose budget subsidised the building, as legislation limited the expenditure of ratepayers’ taxes on the arts.
Wikipedia

Within the projecting corner are the Council Chamber and Lord Mayor’s Parlour; within the main entrance is the impressive main staircase. Everything in this central bay is sumptuous, from the six regal lions surmounting the balustrade over the portico, to the panels of rich carving between the upper storey windows, to the lush foliage on the cornice above. The dome is larger than it seems from below; the pediment, designed by Thomason himself and executed by R. L. Boulton & Sons, shows Britannia with her arms outstretched to reward the Manufacturers of Birmingham with laurel wreaths. N.B., Richard Lockwood Boulton (c.1832-1905), an admirer of Ruskin, also worked on the carvings on Northampton Town Hall . . . The main staircase rises from the entrance past an elegant lift on the right, installed to take Edward VII up on his visit of 1909. It divides into two at the half-landing. Here, Thomas Woolner’s touching statue of a young Queen Victoria stands opposite John Henry Foley’s more formal statue of Prince Albert. Above rises the inner part of the dome, nicely described as rising “on eight ribs with rosettes decorating the intervening panels, and spectacular squinches with three setbacks” — “squinches” being the supports, here recessed with intricate carving on each of the arches, for the heavy dome. The banqueting rooms at the front are especially grand.
Victorian Web (with photos)

Royal Exchange, London


Royal Exchange, London
1900s
Publisher: Horrocks & Co, Ashton

The Royal Exchange in London was founded in the 16th century by the merchant Sir Thomas Gresham on the suggestion of his factor Richard Clough to act as a centre of commerce for the City of London. The site was provided by the City of London Corporation and the Worshipful Company of Mercers, who still jointly own the freehold. It is trapezoidal in shape and is flanked by Cornhill and Threadneedle Street, which converge at Bank junction in the heart of the city. It lies in the ward of Cornhill. It has twice been destroyed by fire and subsequently rebuilt. The present building was designed by Sir William Tite in the 1840s. The site was notably occupied by the Lloyd’s insurance market for nearly 150 years.
Wikipedia

First Royal Exchange, “The Pictorial handbook of London : comprising its antiquities, architecture, arts, manufacture, trade, social, literary, and scientific institutions, exhibitions, and galleries of art : together with some account of the principal suburbs and most attractive localities” John Weale, 1854, p. 367

Based on the Antwerp Stock Exchange (Bourse) in Belgium, Gresham’s bourse consisted of a trading floor, offices and shops around an open courtyard where merchants and traders could meet and conduct their business. The original Royal Exchange building was completely destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666
Walk London

This month [January 2021] marks the 450th anniversary of the opening of London’s Royal Exchange, a complex created to act as a commercial centre in the City of London. The exchange was built on the orders – and with the funds – of the merchant Sir Thomas Gresham at a site on the junction of Cornhill and Threadneedle streets which was – and still is – jointly owned by the City of London Corporation and the Worshipful Company of Mercers. Drawing inspiration from the Antwerp Bourse, credited as the oldest financial exchange in the world (and where Sir Thomas had served as an agent of the crown), the Royal Exchange was built in ranges around a central courtyard and designed by an architect from Antwerp. … Gresham’s original building – to which two floors of retail had been added in 1660, creating what is said to have been England’s first shopping mall – was sadly destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It was replaced by a second complex, this time designed by Edward Jarman, in 1669, but this too succumbed to fire, this time on 10th January, 1838. The building which now stands on the site – and is now an upmarket retail centre – was designed by Sir William Tite and was opened by another Queen, Victoria, in 1844.
Exploring London

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Kensington Gardens, London


Kensington Gardens
1900s

Google Street VIew (approximate)

Kensington Gardens, once the private gardens of Kensington Palace, are among the Royal Parks of London. . . . Kensington Gardens was originally the western section of Hyde Park, which had been created by Henry VIII in 1536 to use as a hunting ground. It was separated from the remainder of Hyde Park in 1728 at the request of Queen Caroline and designed by Henry Wise and Charles Bridgeman in order to form a landscape garden, with fashionable features including the Round Pond, formal avenues and a sunken Dutch garden. Bridgeman created the Serpentine between 1726 and 1731 by damming the eastern outflow of the River Westbourne from Hyde Park. The part of the Serpentine that lies within Kensington Gardens is known as “The Long Water”. At its north-western end (originally the inflow of the River Westbourne), in an area known as “The Italian Garden”, there are four fountains and a number of classical sculptures. At the foot of the Italian Gardens is a parish boundary marker, delineating the boundary between Paddington and St George Hanover Square parishes, on the exact centre of the Westbourne river. Kensington Gardens were opened to the public in 1841.
Wikipedia

Map of Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens, “The American Cyclopædia” vol 13, 1879 (from Wikimedia Commons). “Italian Gardens are marked as “WW”

The Italian Gardens are an elaborate mix of four main basins. They feature central rosettes carved in Carrara marble, the Portland stone and white marble Tazza Fountain, and a collection of stone statues and urns. . . . The gardens are believed to have been a gift from Prince Albert to his beloved Queen Victoria. They are now recognised as being a site of particular importance and are Grade II listed by Historic England. The layout of the Italian Gardens can be traced to Osborne House on The Isle of Wight, where the royal family spent its holidays. Prince Albert was a keen gardener and took charge of the gardens at Osborne House, where he introduced an Italian garden with large raised terraces, fountains, urns and geometric flower beds. In 1860 he brought the idea to Kensington Gardens. The design by James Pennethorne includes many features of the Osborne garden.
Royal Parks

Post Office, Liverpool


Post Office, Liverpool
c.1910

For much of the 19th century the General PostGlossary Term Office was located in the Custom House in Canning Place, until this specially designed building was constructed in Victoria Street between 1894 and 1899. The architect was Henry Tanner, a Principal Architect (Chief Architect from 1898) in the Office of Works, whose other postal buildings include the contemporary General PostGlossary Term Office in Leeds. The Victoria Street building was exceptionally ambitious, originally resembling a Loire chateau with an eventful skyline of shaped gables, chimneys and pavilionGlossary Term roofs. The decoration included sculpture by Edward O. Griffith around the main entrance. Unfortunately, the upper floors were removed following bomb damage in the Second World War, and the interior was gutted
Looking at buildings

The new Post-office in Victoria-street was opened on Wednesday by the Duke of York. The building has a frontage to Victoria-street of 226ft., to St. Thomas-street of 254ft., to Stanley-street of 260ft., and has a yard comprising 103ft. square. The site covers nearly two acres of ground. In front of the second floor there are four figures representing England and Scotland and Ireland and Wales, the two pairs standing hand-in-hand. There are ten smaller figures, representing colonies. Below there are figures typifying Commerce and Industry, and Electricity and Engineering. The total cost of the site, including premises in Cumberland-street and Whitechapel, will be about £200,000, and another £100,000 or thereabouts will be required for building purposes, and for supplying fittings, engines, electric-light wires, and pneumatic tubes. The building is considered absolutely proof against fire, very little woodwork being used, except in the way of furniture and fittings.

The new buildings contain the following offices : Public, sorting, packet, parcel, and registered-letter offices; postmen’s room, returned-letter branch, telephone-room, telegraph-instrument room, yard, bag and basket-room, and telegraph messengers’ and delivery room. On the second floor are the scullery, kitchen, and carving, serving, and dining-rooms, the latter measuring 30ft. by 73ft., and having seats for 190 persons. The walls of these rooms, and of all the staircases and retiring-rooms, are of white glazed bricks, with dado of dark tiles. The inner vestibule and the postmaster’s staircase, inside the west door in Victoria-street, are of Hopton Wood marble. The doors are of teak, and the public office counter of sabicu (a hard Cuban wood), the other fittings being of mahogany.
“The Building News”, 21 July 1899

Tower, New Brighton, Wallasey


Tower and Lake
New Brighton
c.1910
Publisher: Valentine

Google Street View.

1937 map showing location of park and tower

New Brighton Tower was a steel lattice observation tower at New Brighton in the town of Wallasey, Cheshire (now in the Borough of Wirral, in Merseyside), England. It stood 567 feet (173 m) high, and was the tallest building in Great Britain when it opened some time between 1898 and 1900. Neglected during the First World War and requiring renovation the owners could not afford, dismantling of the tower began in 1919, and the metal was sold for scrap. The building at its base, housing the Tower Ballroom, continued in use until damaged by fire in 1969. The tower was set in large grounds, which included a boating lake, a funfair, gardens, and a sports ground. The sports ground housed, at different times, a football team, an athletics track and a motorcycle speedway track.

New Brighton Tower regularly advertised itself as “the highest structure and finest place of amusement in the Kingdom”. A single entrance fee of one shilling (or a ticket for the summer season, costing 10s 6d) was charged for entrance into the grounds, which included the gardens, the athletic grounds, the ballroom and the theatre. An additional charge of sixpence was levied on those who wished to go to the top of the tower. There was a menagerie within the building, containing Nubian lions, Russian wolves (which had eight cubs in 1914), bears in a bear pit, monkeys, elephants, stags, leopards and other animals. There was also an aviary above the ballroom. The Tower Building also contained a shooting gallery and a billiard saloon with five tables.
Wikipedia.

New Brighton Tower prior to its demolition in 1919. (from Wikimedia Commons).

Under the tower was an octagonal building housing a ball room and theatre. The ‘Tower Ballroom’ was one of the largest in the world and provided a sprung floor and band stage. It was decorated in white and gold and included a balcony to watch the dancers. Next to the ballroom was a billiard saloon and above it were a monkey house, aviary and shooting gallery. The theatre could accommodate 3,500 people and had the largest stage in the world measuring 45 feet wide and 72 feet deep. The grounds around the tower provided numerous other facilities. The Tower Gardens, covering 35 acres, included a Japanese Cafe, Venetian Gondolas, Parisian Tea Garden and outdoor dancing platform. The ‘Old English Fairground’ provided a switchback railway, water chute, lion house and menagerie.
Citizan

The Tower was illuminated at night with fairy lights, as were the grounds. 30,000 red, white and green around the many pathways. Admission to the grounds was a shilling, which included admission to the Ballroom and Theatre. . . . The Ballroom was one of the largest in the world, with a sprung floor and dance band stage. The orchestra had as many as 60 players. . . It was decorated in white and gold, with the emblems of various Lancashire towns. The Ballroom had a balcony, with seats to watch the dancers below. . . Above the Ballroom there was a Monkey House and Aviary in the Elevator Hall and also a Shooting Gallery.
. . .
The Tower Gardens had much to offer also. The whole area covered 35 acres. There was a large Japanese Cafe at the lakeside, where the real Gondoliers had Venetian Gondolas. There was also a fountain and seal pond in the old quarry, with its rockery. Then there was the Parisian Tea Garden where one could enjoy a cup of tea and watch the pierrots. Situated in the trees was a restaurant called ‘The Rock Point Castle’. At the Promenade end there was an outdoor dancing platform which could hold over a thousand dancers where also the Military Band played.
History of Wallasey

Standing at 567ft, it was the tallest building in the country. Visitors at the time were charged a single entrance fee of one shilling which allowed them to get into the tower grounds, and included a ballroom, theatre, gardens and athletic grounds. However, if guests were brave enough to go up the tower they were charged an additional sixpence for the pleasure. But once at the top, they were rewarded with spectacular views – on clear days, it was possible to see as far as the Isle of Man across the Irish Sea, the Lake District and the Welsh mountains.
“What happened to New Brighton Tower and why was it taken down?”, Liverpool Echo

NIGHT ON A TOWER
When the first lift ascended on the morning of 8th September, to the top of the New Brighton tower, on the Cheshire side of Mersey, tho attendant was astonished to see a woman and her 12-year-old daughter walk into the lift for the purpose of descending. The two bad been on the top of the tower since half-past 9 the previous evening. It is customary (says “Lloyd’s Weekly News”) before the descent of the last lift to give an intimation to that effect, to anyone who may be on the tower summit. Apparently the . woman and her daughter did not hear it, and they passed unnoticed when the usual round of inspection was made previous to the final lift going down. Finding themselves unable to make known their plight to others some 600 feet below, they made themselves as comfortable as possible in tho covered-in portion of the tower top. When they were rescued from their position, they took their experience quite philosophically, merely complaining that they had spent a cold, sleepless night, and leaving the tower grounds without even giving their names to the officials.
The Telegraph, 26 October 1909

In 1914, it was closed to the public following the outbreak of the First World War. With closure, lack of maintenance caused the steel superstructure to rust. The tower was eventually taken down between 1919 and 1921. Despite the tower’s removal, its ballroom continued to be used for almost the next 50 years. Many famous acts visited the New Brighton venue including Little Richard The Beatles and the Rolling Stones. . . . The end of the Tower came when it was destroyed by fire on Saturday 5th April 1969, the heroic attempts by the fire brigade who fought the flames for hours was in vain, the walls started to collapse and this magnificent building just died.
Wallasey and the Dutton Family

New Brighton, Cheshire
Stands at the mouth of the Mersey 31 miles north west of Liverpool It has a pier battery and lighthouse and will no doubt soon become a well known watering place Provisions are dear The population numbers 3319
Routes. — By London and North Western Great Northern Midland or Great Western Railways to Liverpool thence by ferry every quarter of an hour
Climate and Season.– The climate is good and the season from June to September.
Beach and Scenery.– The beach is fine hard smooth sand and very safe and the bathing is good vans plentiful The surrounding country undulated
Objects of Interest.– Wallasey Bid Seacombe Ferry the Battery which is open to public are in the vicinity and trips can be made to Liverpool where picture galleries botanical gardens parks St George’s Hall museums & c Eastham 6 miles New Ferry 4 miles Birkenhead Bangor Rhyl the Isle of Man & c by steamer
Amusements.– A band plays on the pier and boating & c can be had and there are Assembly rooms in the Abion road Churches St James and various
“The dictionary of watering places … at home and abroad”, 1883, pp. 72-3

Tresco Abbey Gardens, Isles of Scilly


Scilly Isles. Old Abbey Ruins. Dracaena in Bloom.
c.1910
Publisher: Pictorial Stationery Co.

Google Street View.

In 1834, Augustus Smith left Hertfordshire and took up residence on the Isles of Scilly as Lord Proprietor and leaseholder of all the islands, choosing Tresco as his home… He selected a site adjacent to St Nicholas Priory – which had fallen into disrepair in the sixteenth century – to build his home. On a rocky outcrop above these ruins, Augustus Smith built his house, which he named Tresco Abbey. In addition to constructing the house, he started almost immediately creating a garden based around the priory ruins. In order to protect his early plantings from the winter gales, he built a series of walls around the garden. The garden then expanded across the south-facing hillside on a series of terraces carved from the granite subsoil.
Tresco Island

Tresco Priory is a former monastic settlement on Tresco, Isles of Scilly founded in 946 AD. It was re-founded as the Priory of St Nicholas by monks from Tavistock Abbey in 1114. A charter of King Henry I mentions a priory as belonging to Tavistock Abbey in the reign of Edward the Confessor. . . The Priory did not survive the Dissolution of the Monasteries and may well have closed earlier. The remains of the priory are now incorporated into Tresco Abbey Gardens.
Wikipedia.


Scilly. | Tresco Abbey.
c.1910

Google Street View.

Tresco Abbey Gardens are located on the island of Tresco in the Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom. The 17 acre gardens were established by the nineteenth-century proprietor of the islands, Augustus Smith, originally as a private garden within the grounds of the home he designed and built. The gardens are designated at Grade I in the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.

Augustus Smith chose Tresco as the site of his home because the site was more or less central in relation to the rest of the islands. It is also close to the original abbey ruins, is near a fresh water pool and overlooks the sand dunes and beach at Carn Near. The area at the time was barren land and the original building, designed by Smith and started in 1835, was small in comparison to the current building. He made additions to the house in 1843 and 1861. The Grade II listed house consists of roughly coursed granite with ashlar dressings and a slate roof. Some of the timbers from the 1861 wreck of the Award were used for the panelling and roof of the new dining room, as well as panelling of the rooms Annet, Rosevean and Rosevear. His successor, Thomas Smith-Dorrien-Smith, added the tower in 1891.
Wikipedia.

Country house. Mostly of 1843 and 1861, with tower of 1891, for Augustus Smith and Thomas Algernon Dorrien Smith. Roughly coursed granite with ashlar dressings; slate roofs and granite ashlar stacks. Complex evolved plan: main square block with east tower, to east of west wing and south-west wing. 2 and 3 storeys. North elevation has 3-storey entrance bay between main block and west wing, with monogram AS and date 1843 over chamfered 4-centred arched doorway; this is flanked by a slender 3-storey tower with small windows
Historic England


Mesembryanthemums
Aloes Steps, Tresco
Scilly

c.1910
Publisher: “The ‘Neptune’ Series by C. King, Scilly Isles”

Google Street View.

Bramhope Tunnel, West Yorkshire


Bramhope Tunnel – North Eastern Railway
1910s
Publisher: The Alphalsa Publishing Co., Ltd., 284, Scrutton St, London

Google Street View.

The Bramhope Tunnel is a railway tunnel 2.138 miles (3,745 Yards) long built for the Leeds and Thirsk Railway, the Leeds Northern Railway and the East and West Yorkshire Junction Railway, which together later became the North Eastern Railway. 1845-49 It was constructed on the Harrogate Line, carrying rural and commuter passengers between Horsforth and Weeton in West Yorkshire, England. It is notable for its length, for its crenellated north portal, which is Grade II listed, and for the deaths of 24 men during its construction, commemorated in Otley churchyard with a castellated replica of the north portal.

It was constructed by Thomas Grainger, engineer and James Bray, overseer, who set up two sighting towers and then twenty shafts along the line of the tunnel. Men dug horizontally from these shafts until the diggings joined up in 1848. Thousands of navvies lived locally in bothies with their families, and dug in dangerous and wet conditions to facilitate the grand opening in 1849.
Grace’s Guide to British Industrial History

The foundation stone was laid at Shaft 1 in July 1846, once a shaft was finished teams of miners were lowered down to create header tunnels, smaller 8ft x 8ft tunnels shored up by beams and joined up to make a complete mini version of the tunnel. This ensured the line was true and made communication easier. Behind the miners, labourers laid a line of temporary rails for spoil to be removed. Once the headers were complete the excavation was worked in lengths of 12ft, the excavators would move to the opposing side of the shaft and begin digging there while a team of labourers and bricklayers would take their place and begin building the tunnel walls. On Bramhope tunnel there was a total of 22 teams working at any one time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
. . .
Each end of the tunnel received very different treatment, the Gothic north portal was given a castellated finish (now grade II listed) containing rooms used by railway staff. The south entrance is very plain by comparison, a sandstone horseshoe-shaped arch below a cornice and a parapet. The tunnel was completed November 27th, 1848 and the first train went through it May 31st, Leeds and Thirsk railway officials pulled by Bray’s locomotive Stephenson.
The Secret Library

Wilson Worsdell’s Class R (LNER D20) was introduced on the North Eastern Railway (NER) in 1899. It proved to be an extremely capable locomotive, but by 1907 there was a need locomotives of greater power to handle the increasing train loads. The NER already had a number of more powerful designs, but these were better suited to more onerous duties. The larger Class S1 (LNER B14) engines were not entirely successful. So Wilson Worsdell’s choice was between building more of his Class V (LNER C6) Atlantics, or designing a larger version of the successful D20. The C6 had not been an unqualified success, so he chose the modify the D20. The new design, NER Class R1 (LNER D21) attempted to combine the wheels and cylinders of the D20 with a larger boiler based on the C6’s boiler. In order to use the larger boiler, the D20 boiler was extended by 2ft at the rear. The boiler pressure was also increased to 225psi, and the grate area was increased from 20 to 27sq.ft. The final locomotive had a high adhesive weight of almost 21 tons, reflecting its intended use on the heaviest expresses, rather than the high speed light trains.

The D21s definitely looked impressive with their large boilers, but they turned out to be not quite as good as either the D20s or the C6s. Hence only one batch was built in 1908-9 at Darlington.
The London & North Eastern Railway Encyclopedia

Cleeve Lock, River Thames, Oxfordshire


Goring
c.1910

Google Street View.

Cleeve Lock is a lock on the River Thames, in Oxfordshire, England. It is located just upstream of Goring and Streatley villages, on the eastern side of the river within the village of Goring. There was formerly a separate Cleeve village, after which the lock is named, but it is now considered to be part of Goring. The first lock was built in 1787 by the Thames Navigation Commissioners. The reach above the lock is the longest, and the reach below it is the shortest, on the non-tidal river. . . . There was a flash lock recorded on the site in the 16th century. The first pound lock was built of oak in 1787 alongside a meadow which was then known as Winch Meadow. It was originally to be called Streatley Lock, but in the event took its name from the village of Cleeve on the opposite side of the river. Until 1869 Cleeve Lock and Goring Lock were usually operated a single keeper. The lock was rebuilt in 1874.
Wikipedia.

Way back in the 16th century a flash lock was documented here at Cleeve, the placename coming from a cliff, or clift – a cutting of a channel by water. This weir was converted into an oak pound lock in 1787 and rebuilt in stone in 1874 and converted to hydraulic operation in 1966/7. The lock had its own lock house by the tail gates but this was demolished and a new house was built in 1958 alongside the centre of the lock chamber.
The River Thames Guide

Shaky Bridge, Llandrindod Wells, Wales


Shaky Bridge, Llandrindod Wells
Postmarked 1908
Publisher:

Google Street View (approximate).

A former river crossing over the Ithon usually known as Shakey Bridge, but [on this picture] captioned Shaky Bridge. This rather unsafe looking structure, made of planks suspended on wires, was built in the 1890s.
People’s Collection Wales

This is a circular walk of 6.5km (5.5 miles) graded as medium. Halfway round is the popular beauty spot at Shaky Bridge – the original wire bridge across the river Ithon was dangerously shaky. There is a picnic site which can be reached from Town by road and is a setting off point to explore Bailey Einon Nature Reserve, the grass covered ruins of Cefnllys Castle andthe 14th cent. Church of St Michael.
Llandrindod Wells