King’s Hall, Belfast


The King’s Hall, Balmoral, Befast.
Ireland’s greatest exhibition hall, biult by the Royal Ulster Agicultural Society.
And opened on 29th May, 1934, by H.R.H. the Duke of Gloucester K.G.
Postmarked 1939
Publisher: Hurst & Co

The King’s Hall was a multi-purpose venue located in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The King’s Hall consisted of 6 event venues. The King’s Hall is owned by the Royal Ulster Agricultural Society (RUAS) (previously the North East Agricultural Association of Ireland), who moved to the venue in 1896 from their previous showgrounds in Belfast Corporation Markets area.
. . .
The King’s Hall was designed by Leitch and Partners, Glasgow, built in 1933 by J & R Thompson, Belfast and opened by the Duke of Gloucester on 29 May 1934. The King’s Hall was the largest exhibition venue in Northern Ireland and prior to the completion of the Odyssey and the Waterfront Hall, was the only large concert venue in Northern Ireland. It hosted the Balmoral Show, an annual agricultural show with regular attendees in excess of 75,000. The stepped facade of the hall features substantial windows and Art Deco motifs on doors and buttresses. Inside, the functional space is spanned by reinforced concrete arches.
Wikipedia.

The Kings Hall at the Balmoral Showgrounds was constructed in 1933-34 as a permanent exhibition hall for the Royal Ulster Agricultural Society and was officially opened on 29th May 1934 by H.R.H. the Duke of Gloucester, being renamed the ‘King’s Hall’ by the permission of King George V. The Royal Ulster Agricultural Society immediately put the Kings Hall to use for a variety of purposes. In 1936 alone the hall was utilised for a number of exhibitions, evangelical meetings, boxing and wrestling contests and a circus that was held at Christmas. Staples of the annual schedule at the Kings Hall included the Ideal Home Show, motor shows and wedding exhibitions. In later decades the hall would also be used for music concerts; the Beatles famously performed at the Kings Hall on 2nd November 1964. The Kings Hall was put to a very different use during the Second World War when the exhibition hall was requisitioned for the duration of the conflict. The premises at Balmoral were occupied until a few months after the end of hostilities in 1945. The Air Ministry (Ministry of Supply) acquired the site in 1940 and converted the Kings Hall into an aircraft factory for Short Bros. & Harland in order to construct fuselages for Stirling Bombers.
King’s Hall Health and Wellbeing Park

Trent Bridge & Midlands Industrial Exhibition, Nottingham, England


Trent Bridge, Nottingham
c.1904
Publisher: “S & Co, Nottm”

Midlands Industrial Exhibition in background.

Google Street View.

Constructed in an eye-catching Mughal (Indian) style, the steel-framed main building had two floors and was named the ‘Ivory Palace’. Its construction was swift with two different contractors working from either end, although reputedly there was a problem when they met in the middle as the alignment was discovered to be a few inches awry. The grounds housed a Japanese tea house, Canadian water chute (nearly 100 feet high and with a 600 foot slope), an American roller coaster, ‘Tom Thumb’ miniature railway, ‘Hampton Court maze’, and a ‘Fairy River’ that took visitors through caverns past walls set with magical scenes and down ‘a lane of stalactites a mile long’.

Unfortunately, the ‘greatest thing’ lasted a mere 14 months as on the night of 4 July 1904 an electrical fault in one of the Fairy River caverns caused a fire and while all the visitors were successfully evacuated, the conflagration spread rapidly across the site with flames leaping hundreds of feet into the air and threatening houses in nearby streets.
Picture Nottingham


The Exhibition, Nottingham
c.1904
Publisher: Stewart & Woolf

On the back, in the message section, this card has this typed:

Dear Auntie,
Nottingham is noted for many things and amongst others as being the birth-places and home of the Fountain Head Tea, packed by Smith Fowler & Co. They sold tea to Grandma 80 years ago and are selling it to us today. We cannot get any other so reliable.
Your affectionately, DOLLY


Trent Bridges, Nottingham
c.1910

Town Arms (now Brewhouse & Kitchen) on the left.

Google Street View

Trent Bridge is an iron and stone road bridge across the River Trent in Nottingham, England. It is the principal river crossing for entrance to the city from the south, although the upstream Clifton Bridge is both larger and busier. . . . The bridge was designed by Marriott Ogle Tarbotton. Construction started in 1868 and was completed in 1871 by Derbyshire iron maker, Andrew Handyside. The general contractor was Benton and Woodiwiss of Derby. It was completed for a cost of £30,000 (equivalent to £2,813,922 as of 2019). There were three main cast iron arch spans each 100 feet (30 m) braced by wrought iron girders. The width between the parapets was 40 feet (12 m). It is a Grade II listed building. The carving on the bridge was executed by Mawer and Ingle of Leeds. The new Trent Bridge formed part of a series of works along the banks of the river to improve flood defences by the construction of stepped, stone embankments.
Wikipedia.


Trent Bridge, Nottingham
Postmarked 1950
Publisher: Valentine & Sons