Pirita, Estonia


Pirita
Postmarked 1925
Publisher: “M T S”

Google Street View.

The Pirita district evolved around a convent built in the fifteenth century whose remarkable ruins characterise the area even today. The two-kilometre sandy beach, shores of the Pirita River, river valley, and coastal pine forest complete with an adventure park are ideal places for physical activity and leisure. The yacht harbour and restaurant on the mouth of Pirita River embody the carefree flow of life in Pirita.
Visit Tallin

A bit further out from Kadriorg is another district that provides an escape from the downtown bustle – Pirita. The sprawling district is actually within Tallinn’s boundaries, only a 10 – 15 minute ride from the city centre. When you get here though, you’d never believe you were in the same universe as the rest of Tallinn; suddenly you’re surrounded by dense forest, fresh air and, best of all, the blissful sound of silence. When most Tallinners think of Pirita, they think of the popular beach, which can get packed with thousands of nearly naked bodies on any sunny weekend. But there’s much more to Pirita than suntan lotion and bare skin. The region has a history that goes back at least as far as the early 15th century, when the now-famous Pirita convent was founded on the banks of the Pirita River. Pirita stayed fairly rural through the centuries, but after World War II, partitions of land were given out to Estonians to build homes on, and Pirita began to evolve into the residential district it is today.
In Your Pocket

Delftse Poort, Rotterdam, Netherlands


Rotterdam
Postmarked 1914
Publisher: Siegmund Hildesheimer & Co, London & Manchester (1830-1920) “Views of Holland series”

The Delftse Poort was built in 1545 as part of the Rotterdam’s fortification, protecting it from raiders and attackers. Over the years and through the ages, the use for such a structure diminished, but the gate remained as a monument to the city’s past. The gate was rebuilt three times after the original structure had become unstable. In the 1930s, an attempt was made to demolish it to free up space for infrastructure, however, the people spoke up and eventually, the city decided to move the gate to a different spot instead.

Unfortunately, the WWII began and the gate—and city as a whole—was severely damaged in the course of multiple bombings. After the war, reconstruction began and the city slowly grew back. The medieval gate was forgotten until artist Cor Kraat sought to resurrect it. Cor Kraat was opposed to the gray and tasteless architectural style that was used right after the war. Calling the houses gray blocks, he spent much of his life trying to bring contrast and color to the city. The gate was put back in 1993 as a skeleton made out of orange metal beams to symbolize how Rotterdam is constantly under construction.
Atlas Obscura

Google Street View: reimagined gate


“In the foreground the Delftsevaart and the Haagseveer, affected by the German bombardment of 14 May 1940” (from Wikimedia Commons)

Cologne, Germany


(on back) Köln a. Rh. Panorama bei Nacht
Panoroma at Night, Cologne

Google Street View.


Köln a. Rh. Panorama 
1910s
Publisher: Heinrich Worringen, Cologne


Köln a. Rh. – Am Rheinufer
1900s.
Publisher: Knackstedt & Nather

Google Street View (approximate).


Köln a. Rh. – Totalansicht
c.1912
Publisher

Google Street View.

The new bridge (pontoon) was built in 1822. In order to ensure the possibility of navigation three times a day, the middle part of the bridge was turned. In the middle of the 19th century, during the design of the Cathedral Bridge, it was decided to create a railway and street bridge, but the plans were never implemented. The cathedral bridge was erected only for railway traffic, and the pontoon bridge began to function as a street one. In 1913, the construction of a suspension bridge designed by Karl Moritz was started on the site of the pontoon bridge, which continued on for two years.
UsefulTravelArticles.com

Nikolaevsky Bridge, St Petersburg

С.-Петербургь НиколаевскнІ Мость
St. Pétersbourg Pont Nicolaus

Edition “Richard”, St.-Petersbourg. No. 41892

Nikolaevsky Bridge (Annunciation Bridge), St Petersburg.

Postmarked 1965 but  St Petersburg was renamed Petrograd in 1914 and from Metro Postcard, publisher was in operation from 1903-1917

(Cyrillic didn’t copy very well. It might vary depending on font used.)

Street View