Grand Canal, Trieste, Italy


TRIESTE
Canale Grande e Chiesa St. Atonio
[Canal Grande and Church of Sant’Antonio Nuovo]
1910s
Publisher: Ludovico Smolars & Nipoti

Google Street View.

The Canal grande is a navigable canal located in the heart of the Borgo Teresiano, in the very center of the city of Trieste, approximately halfway between the railway station and Piazza Unità d’Italia. It was built between 1754 and 1756 by the Venetian Matteo Pirona, further digging the main collector of the salt pans, when these were buried to allow the urban development of the city outside its walls. It was built so that boats could come directly to the city center to unload their goods. In its initial conformation, the canal was longer than it is today, reaching as far as the church of Sant’Antonio. The terminal part of the canal was buried in 1934, with rubble resulting from the demolition of the old city, thus obtaining the current Piazza Sant’Antonio.
Wikipedia.

Present-day Borgo Teresiano (from Corso Italia to Piazza della Libertà) was once an area of salt marshes, now completely reclaimed. The channels perpendicular to the seafront were surveyed extensively and plans were made to excavate them in order to expand the navigable area of the city and allow easy loading / unloading of goods at canal-side warehouses, but the project was later abandoned and the Canal Grande remained the city’s only canal. . . . The canal was one of the nerve centres of Trieste’s commercial hub. Its banks are still lined with the squares, churches and historic cafés built by the merchants who made the city great
Discover Trieste

Canal, Bruges


Bruges — Qual du Pont de la Clef
c.1920
Publisher: Enrest Thill

Google Street View.

Sleutelbrug (Key Bridge)
Music lovers, go and visit this ancient bridge dating as far back as the year 1331. The ‘key’ in the name does not refer to the treble clef, but to the 15th-century brewery ‘De Sleutels’ (The Keys). This was located more or less where the hotel ‘Monsieur Ernest’ now is. However, it is the Speelmanskapel (Minstrels Guild’s Chapel) that plays first fiddle here. ‘Speelman’ is another word for minstrel or medieval musician. The Bruges musicians were united in a guild and came together in this chapel, one of the city’s last preserved guild chapels. Only they, and no one else, were allowed to officiate at weddings and celebrations in Bruges. Really nice people. Smart, too. The Sleutelbrug is somewhat hidden, but still close to the lively ‘t Zand Square with the Concertgebouw, Bruges’ contemporary music temple.

Visit Bruges

Construction, Panama Canal


Showing lower lock and canal channel to Atlantic, Gatun, Panama Canal.
1910s
Publisher: Isaac L. Maduro, Jr. (1904-1920’s)

Google Street View.

The Gatun Locks, a three-stage flight of locks 1¼ mi (1.9 km) long, lifts ships to the Gatun Lake level, some 87 ft (27 m) above sea level.
Wikipedia.


General View of Miraflores locks, Pedro Miguel locks in the Distance, Panama Canal.
1910s
Publisher: Isaac L. Maduro, Jr. (1904-1920’s)

Google Street View.

Miraflores is the name of one of the three locks that form part of the Panama Canal, and the name of the small lake that separates these locks from the Pedro Miguel Locks upstream. In the Miraflores locks, vessels are lifted (or lowered) 54 feet (16.5 m) in two stages, allowing them to transit to or from the Pacific Ocean port of Balboa in Panama City. Ships cross below the Bridge of the Americas, which connects North and South America.
Wikipedia.

Suez Canal, Egypt


CANAL DE SUEZ. – Ship crossing the Canal.

Publisher: Levy & Neurdein Reunis (1920-1932). image might be earlier.


Canal de SUEZ. – Steamer in lake Timsah – Navire dans le Lac Timsah

Publisher: Levy & Neurdein Reunis (1920-1932). Image might be earlier.

Lake Timsah (Wikipedia_


SUEZ CANAL. – Steamer crossing the Trench of Toussoun

Publisher: Levy Sons & Co. (1895-1919)

Toussoun on 1912 map (right of Lake Timsah)

Read more

Rochor River, Singapore


The Rochor River, Singapore

No dating clues but about 1910.


Malay sampan and boys, Singapore. 

About 1910.

These two cards show the same part of the river (The buildings at the back on the left of the top card are the same as those on the right of the lower card.)

Rochor River is a canalised river in Kallang of the Central Region in Singapore. The river is about 0.8 km in length. Rochor River is a continuation of the Rochor Canal, and begins beneath Victoria Bridge and empties into the Kallang Basin.
Wikipedia

Before the development of land infrastructure, boats and river transport played the role in transportation of goods. Bumboats did not only ply the well-known Singapore River and the quays. They also plied other water bodies like the Kallang River, Rochor River and Rochor Canal for transport purposes. Rochor Canal is a continuation of a canal that begins from as far as the Bukit Timah area, its water source. Officially, only the section after the Kandang Kerbau Bridge is named Rochor Canal. It continues along the aptly named Rochor Canal Road and ends at Victoria Bridge, where it continues as Rochor River. It is one of five waterways that empties into the Marina Reservoir.

Rochor Canal gave rise to one of the earliest industries in Little India – cattle trade. The natural pasture fed by the waters of the Rochor Canal suited cattle trade. Many streets in Little India are named after this cattle trade legacy, such as Belilios Road (named after a prominent cattle trader), Buffalo Road, Desker Road (named after an abbatoir merchant), and Kerbau Road (kerbau means cattle in Malay). Kandang Kerbau means buffalo or cattle pen in Malay. The growth of cattle trade fuelled other industries. The first municipal incinerators were constructed off Jalan Besar and later, more municipal abbatoirs were built. Along the canal were rubber factories, ice works, and markets for used goods.
Rochor Canal as a Historic Waterway

Rochor River (modern photos and a map)

Incline, Lake Biwa Canal, Kyoto, Japan


Keage Incline on Street View

Lake Biwa Canal is a waterway in Japan constructed during the Meiji Period to transport water, freight, and passengers from Lake Biwa to the nearby City of Kyoto. The canal supplied Japan’s first public hydroelectric power generator, which served from 1895 to provide electricity for Kyoto’s trams…Due to the 36 meter difference in elevation between the upstream dam and its terminus, an inclined plane was built, which allowed boats to travel on land via the use of a flat car on which they were placed. Operation of the 9 ft (2,743 mm) track gauge incline ceased in 1948.
Wikipedia

Canal Museum.