Friedrichstraße station, Berlin


Friedrichs-Bahnof. Zum Franziskener
c.1900
Publisher: F. Schüler. Berlin

Google Street View.

Berlin Friedrichstraße is a railway station in the German capital Berlin. It is located on the Friedrichstraße, a major north-south street in the Mitte district of Berlin, adjacent to the point where the street crosses the river Spree. . . In 1878, the first station was built after plans by Johannes Vollmer between the Friedrichstraße and the river Spree as part of the Berlin Stadtbahn construction. The architect was working on the neighbouring Hackescher Markt station at the same time. Just as the elevated viaduct the station is integrated into, the station rests on large arches built with masonry. The station had two platforms with two tracks each, covered by a large, curved train shed which rested on steel trusses of different length to cover the curvature of the viaduct underneath. The main entrance was on the northern side, the pick-up for horse carriages on the south side. Station opening was on 7 February 1882, as part of the ceremonial opening of the Berlin Stadtbahn. Long distance trains started on 15 May the same year.
Wikipedia.

“Berlin Friedrichstraße station: the prospective train shed; view east towards Friedrichstraße. The engraving is a copy, enlivened with staffage figures, of the original architectural drawing published 1885” (from Wikimedia Commons).
Floor plan, 1885 Technische Universität Berlin, Architekturmuseum

So when the East Germans built the wall that sealed off West Berlin, they made sure to add metal and glass barriers to divide the platforms of Friedrichstrasse as well. The station became an international oddity, in that it was located entirely in East Berlin, but some of its train platforms and all of its underground services were only for West Berliners. Passengers would often have to make a border crossing when moving from one story of the building to the other. For the next 28 years, it was, effectively, a three-dimensional border, one drawn not between north and south or east and west, but between up and down.
Conde Nast Traveller

(Via Google Translate)
In 1882, the architects Kayser & Groszheim set up the restaurant complex “Zum Franziskaner” in the Stadtbahn arches no. 198-206 east of Friedrichstraße station at Georgenstraße 12 a/13. “This magnificent facility is at the same time the first artistically executed example of the gigantic pubs that have been appearing since the mid-1970s, known as ‘beer churches’ in Berlin folk jokes, in which mostly local beer was served. […] Drawn in the wildest forms of the German Renaissance The exterior architecture of the ‘Franziskaner’ refrains from any attempt to fit harmoniously into the massive and clumsy masonry of the Stadtbahn arches,
The “Zum Franziskaner” beer palace existed here until 1913, after which other establishments have operated at the site to this day
.
Sammlung Online

“Berlin Friedrichstraße station, east-façade”, 1898 (from Wikimedia Commons).

Grand Central Terminal Station, New York City


Grand Central Terminal Station, New York City
On back:
GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL.
NEW YORK CITY.
The Grand Central Terminal covers 69.8 acres facing East 42nd Street, from Vanderbilt to Lexington Avenue, the largest and most costly Railroad Station in the world. It has 31 miles of tracks under cover, with a capacity for handling 200 trains and 70,000 passengers each hour. There are 42 tracks for long distance express trains on the 42nd Street level, and 25 trakcs for surburban trains in concourse. 25 feet below the Street.
c.1918 (from a postmark on another card in the same series)
Publisher: American Art Publishing Co, New York City (1918-1925)

Google Street View.

GCT is the largest train station in the world in terms of area occupied and number of platforms. The terminal is spread over 49 acres and has 44 platforms. The station is used by more than one million people a week. It serves the Metro-North Commuter railroad, which passes through the city’s suburbs and goes out to Connecticut and New Jersey. The station is currently owned and operated by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA).
Railway Technology

As train traffic increased in the late 1890s and early 1900s, so did the problems of smoke and soot produced by steam locomotives in the Park Avenue Tunnel, the only approach to the station. This contributed to a crash on January 8, 1902, when a southbound train overran signals in the smoky Park Avenue Tunnel and collided with another southbound train, killing 15 people and injuring more than 30 others.] Shortly afterward, the New York state legislature passed a law to ban all steam trains in Manhattan by 1908. William J. Wilgus, the New York Central’s vice president, later wrote a letter to New York Central president William H. Newman. Wilgus proposed to electrify and place the tracks to Grand Central in tunnels, as well as constructing a new railway terminal with two levels of tracks and making other infrastructure improvements. In March 1903, Wilgus presented a more detailed proposal to the New York Central board. The railroad’s board of directors approved the $35 million project in June 1903; ultimately, almost all of Wilgus’s proposal would be implemented.

The entire building was to be torn down in phases and replaced by the current Grand Central Terminal. It was to be the biggest terminal in the world, both in the size of the building and in the number of tracks. The Grand Central Terminal project was divided into eight phases, though the construction of the terminal itself comprised only two of these phases.
Wikipedia.

Design competitions for major projects were commonplace in the early 1900s, and the railroad launched one in 1903. Four firms entered: McKim Mead & White, Samuel Huckel, Jr., Reed & Stem, and Daniel Burnham. Reed & Stem won. Its innovative scheme featured pedestrian ramps inside, and a ramp-like roadway outside that wrapped around the building to connect the northern and southern halves of Park Avenue. Were these innovations enough to make Grand Central truly grand? The railroad wasn’t sure. So it hired another architecture firm, Warren & Wetmore, which proposed a monumental façade of three triumphal arches. The two chosen firms collaborated as “Associated Architects.” It was a stormy partnership, but the final design combined the best ideas of both.
Grand Central Terminal

 

Gare du Nord (Northern Railway Station) & Boulevard du Denain, Paris


PARIS – La Gare du Nord et le Boulevard Denain
Northern Railway Station
c.1910
Publishers: J. Cormault & E. Papeghin, Paris

Google Street View.

Media Centre for Art History: panorama of a station platform

The Gare du Nord (English: station of the North or North station), officially Paris-Nord, is one of the six large mainline railway station termini in Paris, France. The station accommodates trains between the capital and Northern France via the Paris–Lille railway, as well as to international destinations in Belgium, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. . . . The chairman of the Chemin de Fer du Nord railway company, James Mayer de Rothschild, chose the French architect Jacques Ignace Hittorff to design the current station. Construction of the new complex was carried out between May 1861 to December 1865; the new station actually opened for service while still under construction during 1864. The façade was designed around a triumphal arch and used many slabs of stone. The building has the usual U-shape of a terminus station.
Wikipedia.

Ismailia, Egypt


ISMAILIA – The New Houses of The Canal Company
Published: Costi Damilacos

Ismailia was founded in 1863, during the construction of the Suez Canal, by Khedive Ismail the Magnificent, after whom the city is named. Following the Battle of Kafr-el-Dawwar in 1882 the British established a base there. The head office of the Suez Canal Authority is located in Ismailia at the shore of Lake Timsah. It has a large number of buildings dating from British and French involvement with the Canal. Most of these buildings are currently used by Canal employees and officials.
Wikipedia.


ISMAILIA – The Station
c.1915
Published: Costi Damilacos

Railway station

Union Station, Indianapolis, Indiana


“Union Station”, Indianapolis, Ind.
c.1910

In 1847, the Madison & Indianapolis Railroad reached Indianapolis. Railroads connected the young state capital to the rest of the nation. Over the next decade, other major rail lines would reach town. Because the railroads crossed through at various locations, connections for freight and travelers were complicated. In August 1849, Union Railway Company formed to solve the problem. The company laid tracks to connect the railroads, then built a large brick train shed where all lines met – America’s first Union Station, which was located on this site. As the city’s rail-based trade grew, rail, business, and civic leaders wanted a new station befitting the importance of railroads to Indianapolis. In 1886, the railroads hired Pittsburgh architect Thomas Rodd to plan a new “head house,” or main office/waiting hall.
National Park Service

Wikipedia

Union Station, Washington, D.C.


Union Station, Washington, D.C.
c.1920
On back:
THE NEW UNION STATION AT WASHINGTON was built by the U.S. Government and the Pennsylvania Railroad and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The cost of the land, building and terminal improvements was $18,000,000. The structure is the finest railway station in the world. The building is of white granite, is 760 feet in length and 343 feet in width.

Street View

Washington Union Station is one of the country’s first great union railroad terminals. Designed by renowned architect, Daniel Burnham, the station opened on October 27, 1907 and was completed in April 1908.
Union Station, Washington DC

The first B&O train to arrive with passengers was the Pittsburgh Express, which did so at 6:50 a.m. on October 27, 1907, while the first PRR train arrived three weeks later on November 17. The main building itself was completed in 1908. Of its 32 station tracks, 20 enter from the northeast and terminate at the station’s headhouse. The remaining 12 tracks enter below ground level from the south via a 4,033-foot twin-tube tunnel passing under Capitol Hill and an 898-foot long subway under Massachusetts Avenue which allow through traffic direct access to the rail networks both north and south of the city. Among the new station’s unique features was an opulent “Presidential Suite” (aka “State Reception Suite”) where the U.S. President, State Department, and Congressional leaders could receive distinguished visitors arriving in Washington.
Wikipedia.


Union Station Waiting Room, Washington, D.C.
Published: The Washington New Company, Washington. D.C.
c.1920
On back:
UNION STATION WAITING ROOM, Washington. The new Union Station was built by the U.S. Government and the Pennsylvania Railroad and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The cost of the land, building and terminal improvements was $18,000,000. The structure is the finest railway station in the world. The building is of white granite, is 760 feet in length and 343 feet in width.

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