YMCA, Omaha, USA


Interior of Y.M.C.A Building, Omaha,Neb.
Postmarked 1909
Publisher: Curt Teich Co.

Google Street View (exterior).

The YMCA of Greater Omaha’s roots in the Omaha metropolitan area are woven into the fabric of the community. Founded in 1866 by a Union Pacific employee, the Y first began its impact on the Omaha area as a place to serve young Christian men working on the transcontinental railroad.
YMCA of Greater Omaha

Omaha was a rough and tumble place in the mid-19th century and there was nothing really beyond bars and saloons to entertain young men. In 1868, bylaws for the Young Men’s Christian Association were introduced to Omaha, giving young men something else to do other than hang out in bars and brothels. The YMCA provided lectures and social events for men. The YMCA was interested in improving the spirit, mind and body of young men.

“The first few years the primary focus was meetings. Leadership meetings, lots of religious study classes – bible study,” said UNO history major Marcia Bennett. As the city grew the YMCA grew offering more programs to young men.

“It was all kinds of recreational activities, but then also education was the major focus classes for literally everything advertising scuba diving you could find all kinds of classes to take, during the Great Depression there was a really wide variety just so they could train people to do everything just to get them a job,” said Bennett.
YMCA of Greater Omaha celebrates 150 years

Falls Hut, kunanyi/Mt Wellington, Tasmania


Falls Hut, Hobart in Winter 1910.
1910s
Publisher: McVilly & Little

Other huts

In 1888 a recreational hut was built besides the King’s Sawpits, where the original sawyer’s huts had once been located. From that point onwards, the huts were “a fundamental part … of the mountain experience to locals for over one hundred years” (Lee Andrews & Associates Heritage Consulting, p38). In the period 1890-1910 the hut building reached its peak. In all, through the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, around forty small huts were built on the mountain. They were used as weekend retreats, bases for walking and skiing, or even as homes. They were built of local bush materials, with small touches of refinement, such as ornate mantelpieces, verandahs, bush lattice gables, bridges, fern gardens and cellars. One hut had a piano. Some were linked with telephone wire to warn of approaching guests.
Tasmania Stories

[Falls Hut was] built 1897, originally one room, then two rooms built on, the first subsequently being used as a toolshed. A two-level bridge was built here in 1901. George Mason, a well-known ranger and builder of the original Richards Monument, was the proprietor.
kunanyi/Mt Wellington History


Falls Hut, Cascade, Hobart
c.1910


Falls Hut, Cascades, Hobart, Tas
c.1910
Publisher: McVilly & Little


Falls Hut, Cascades, Hobart
c.1910
Publisher: McVilly & Little


Rustic Bridge, Cascades, Hobart, Tas
c.1910
Publisher: McVilly & Little

Falls Hut was one of the better-known huts which featured frequently on postcards from around 1900 to 1920. Visitors came from interstate and overseas to sample the hut members’ hospitality. The hut was built in 1891 and renovated in 1903 with a new wing and an amazing rustic bridge.
List the Mountain

Schlitz Palm Garden, Milwaukee, USA


Interior, Schlitz Palm Garden, Milwaukee
c.1910
Publisher: E.C. Kropp Co., Milwaukee

Google Street View (approximate) (the tall white building is the same one next door to the hotel in this photo)

Beer gardens and beer halls were key early institutions in the vibrant beer culture that accompanied the development of Milwaukee’s iconic brewing industry. Milwaukeeans and visitors from various ethnic and class backgrounds frequented these establishments located throughout the city to drink beer, listen to music, play games, socialize with friends, neighbors, and family, and partake in the city’s famed gemütlichkeit. Beer gardens and halls were also significant retail outlets for the city’s major breweries, who developed these institutions into extravagant commercial entertainment spaces to help market their brands. . . . Prior to the development of Milwaukee’s municipal park system in the late-nineteenth century, beer gardens fulfilled a growing need for open, public green areas as the city rapidly industrialized and grew denser. Proprietors augmented the city’s natural landscape with ornamental plantings, arbors, nurseries, terraces, animal menageries, and other cultivated elements common to German beer gardens
Encyclopedia of Milwaukeed

The Schlitz Palm Garden opened on June 6, 1896 in downtown Milwaukee next to the Schlitz Hotel. During its prime, the Schlitz Palm Garden was one of the most lavish and popular beer gardens in the city. Topped by a 30 foot dome and regularly featuring concert bands, the Schlitz Palm Garden was a major tourist attraction up until Prohibition caused it to close its doors in March, 1921.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Archives

After Prohibition forced the Schlitz Palm Garden’s to close its doors in 1921, Schlitz Brewing Co. transformed the location into The Garden Theater, an ornate movie theater.
https://3rdstmarkethall.com/history

Villa Marina, Isle of Man


Villa Marina, Royal Hall and Gardens
Postmarked 1947
Publisher: Punch Bowl Press

Google Street View (approximate).

The Villa Marina is an entertainment venue in Douglas, Isle of Man, which forms part of the wider Villa-Gaiety complex. It is located on Harris Promenade, looking out onto Douglas Bay, and comprises the Royal Hall, Broadway Cinema, Promenade Suite, Dragon’s Castle and the Colonnade Gardens. . . . After unsuccessfully advertising the lease for continued use as a hotel, Henry Noble purchased the shares held by John Firth and set about turning the Villa Marina into his personal residence; although there was a degree of consensus at the time that the estate should have been bought and turned into a pleasure ground with a proposal put forward to raise £10,000 in £1 shares for the purchase. . . . The entire site was bequeathed in Noble’s will to the Henry Bloom Noble Trust. The site was used as the venue for several summer garden fetes and parties and provided a particularly good vantage point for the running of the Gordon Bennett Trials, first held on the Isle of Man in 1904. On several occasions the Villa Marina’s grounds played host to open air religious services, one such instance being the annual session of the District Synod of the Primitive Methodist Church (Liverpool District) which was held in Douglas in the Spring of 1906. Following Noble’s death there was a degree of uncertainty as to what would become of the estate, with a fear that it could be sold to property developers as this was the height of the Isle of Man’s tourism boom. However, the trust donated the entire site to Douglas Corporation which then redeveloped the site as an entertainment venue. Upon completion the venue was opened by the Lieutenant Governor, Lord Raglan, on 19 July 1913.

The original name of the venue was the Villa Marina Kursaal. In part this was seen as an attempt by the Corporation to address the town’s perceived lack of sophistication and to raise the town’s profile to visitors. The Germanic term for the venue was dropped at the outbreak of World War I and the venue was renamed the Royal Hall.
Wikipedia.

Lake, St Leger Thermal Spa, Pougues-les-Eaux, France


Pougues-les-Eaux (Nièvre) – Le Lac
c.1910
Pubilsher: Thibault

A drive of a few minutes had landed us in the heart of this little Paradise, baths and Casino standing in the midst of park-like grounds. Apparently Pougues, that is to say, the Pougues-les-Eaux of later days, has been cut out of natural woodland, the Casino gardens and its surroundings being rich in forest trees of superb growth and great variety. The wealth of foliage gives this new fashionable little watering-place an enticingly rural appearance, nor is the attraction of water wholly wanting. . . . A pretty little lake, animated with swans, varies the woodland scenery, and tropical birds in an aviary lend brilliant bits of colour. The usual accessories of a health resort are, of course, here—reading room, concert hall, theatre, and other attractions, rapidly turning the place into a lesser Vichy. The number and magnificence of the hotels, the villas and cottages, that have sprung up on every side, bespeak the popularity of Pougues-les-Eaux, as it is now styled, the surname adding more dignity than harmoniousness.
“East of Paris: Sketches in the Gâtinais, Bourbonnais, and Champagne”, Matilda Betham-Edwards (1902), p. 50

Pougues les Eaux is a town in the Center of France with a Spa and Gambling heritage. Although the Health Spa stopped in 1970, it was known for it’s miraculous water and gambling Casino since the renaissance.
Deserted Health Spa and Casino – Pougues les Eaux

Site is now Parc Saint Léger – Contemporary Art Center, which is here.

Huts, kunanyi/Mt Wellington, Tasmania


Falls Hut, Cascades, Hobart, Tas
Publisher: McVilly & Little

More Falls Hut

In 1888 a recreational hut was built besides the King’s Sawpits, where the original sawyer’s huts had once been located. From that point onwards, the huts were “a fundamental part … of the mountain experience to locals for over one hundred years” Lee Andrews & Associates Heritage Consulting, p38. In the period 1890-1910 the hut building reached its peak. In all, through the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, around forty small huts were built on the mountain. They were used as weekend retreats, bases for walking and skiing, or even as homes. They were built of local bush materials, with small touches of refinement, such as ornate mantelpieces, verandahs, bush lattice gables, bridges, fern gardens and cellars. One hut had a piano. Some were linked with telephone wire to warn of approaching guests.
Tasmania Stories

They were elaborate, rustic, decorative and would look right at home on a South Pacific Island, but these huts were a long way from the tropics. Hobart’s kunanyi/Mount Wellington has long been an adventure playground for nature lovers. More than a century ago, the foothills were dotted with about 30 structures known as “rustic huts”. Built between 1880 and 1920, the huts were popular as recreational retreats. Pianos were transported up, areas cleared for tennis and two huts even had a telephone line strung up. One keen devotee went to the trouble of making a tea set entirely out of coconut shells.
Unearthing history of Hobart’s rustic art nouveau mountain huts (ABC News)

The Melbourne footballers now on a visit to Hobart, had an enjoyable outing yester-day afternoon. At the invitation of Mr. J. W. Cearns they visited the huts on the Cascade Brewery Co.’s estate. They were conveyed as far as the brewery in a special tram, and after a good walk reached their destination. After a look at Forest Hut they proceeded to the Falls Hut, where some good and thoughtful friends had amply provided for their reception, tea and sandwiches being very acceptable after the long walk. Fern Retreat was also looked at, but to this no admittance was obtain-able, it having been decided that the visitors should be entertained at the Falls Hut. One and all expressed them-selves delighted with what they saw, and were loud in their praises at the work done by young Tasmanians in providing such a beautiful spot for visitors. A pleasant hour was spent in viewing the charming scenery, and then the return journey was begun.
The Mercury, 3 July 1896


The Fern Retreat
c.1910

Fern Retreat hut was built in 1890 in what is now Myrtle Gully. There were two versions of the hut in the same location. A small flat area of land below the hut was once used as a tennis court!
kunanyi/Mt Wellington History

The Fern Retreat Hut, built c. 1890, was one of the better-known huts which featured on postcards between 1895 and 1920. It was crushed by a falling log in a storm in July 1904 but rebuilt, better than ever, immediately afterwards.
List the Mountain


Forest Hut, Cascades
c.1905
Published: J. Walch & Sons, Wellington Bridge, Hobart

There were several huts with this name, run by the same group of people. An earlier version of Forest Hut was burned down while occupied, two people narrowly escaped being burned to death. Remains include flat areas, paths, and a rock mound with a hole in the centre is probably a remnant of the members’ habit of surrounding man ferns with rock mounds (the fern being burnt in a fire at some stage).
kunanyi/Mt Wellington History

FOREST HUT DESTROYED BY FIRE.-On Saturday evening the Forest Hut, near the Cascade Brewery, was completely destroyed by fire. A number of young men from the city, who were camping there, all escaped uninjured but one, who was somewhat severely burnt. The hut and contents were destroyed.
The Mercury, 26 June 1900

The Forest Hut was originally built in 1890 as the Blue Bell Hut, but was rebuilt and took on the name Forest Hut later. An 1895 Sydney newspaper report writes: “After having a little rest, we went on, and came to the Bluebell Hut, now called the Forest Hut. This one is the largest and best. It is very nicely fitted up inside. There is a long winding stair made out of ferns to the hut. There is a nice verandah, and also a swing; and they have laid out a garden of ferns, and they are just building a summerhouse. They are going to make a tennis court also.”
List the Mountain

Ski jump, Fiskartorpet, Sweden


“Fiskartorpet”, skidbacke vid Stockholm
c. 1910

Fiskartorpet is a recreational area north of Stockholm, Sweden, in the Djurgården area. It features a small hotel, a conference center, and a number of restaurants. Sporting facilities include an ice hockey rink, a soccer field, and a K-47 ski jump. The owners advertise it as the “world’s smallest ski resort”.

The first ski jump at the site was built in the 1890s.
Wikipedia

The first ski jumping hill at Fiskartorpet was built already in 1890, but the construction which still can be seen today has its origins in 1928. However, in 1982 the hill was closed down for jumping and despite no plans to tear down the extraordinary tower (it should be kept as an historical building), at least the inrun was slowly becoming a ruin. In 2005 Kristian Entin from ski club in Enskede decided to revive the hill and he managed to engage some other ski jumpers and ski friends for the idea. In fall 2005 both hills were repaired and in March 2006 the first competition after 23 years took place.
Ski Jumping Hill Archive

Street View