Casino & Tennis Courts, Mers-les-Bains, France


MERS-les-BAINS – Le Casino et les Tennis
[The Casion & the Tennis]
Publisher: Cie Alsacienne des Arts Photomécaniques

Google Street View.

(Translated with Google Translate)
On January 14, 1890, a treaty was signed between the municipality of Mers-les-Bains and Mr. Deflers for the acquisition of a building used as a casino, for an amount of 40,000 francs. This was rebuilt on the site of the first hot baths establishment, slightly set back (AD Somme, 99 O 2594). It is a pavilion from the Universal Exhibition of 1889, formerly the Duval restaurant, to which two bodies have been added on the ground floor at each end. This fourth casino is a building with an elongated plan, with corner pavilions, the central part of which consists of a square floor. Made of wood, it has lambrequins and large windows. In good weather, fabric awnings protect the terrace. Its dimensions are 39.39 meters long and 17.30 meters wide and 7.84 meters high under the ceiling in the central part. The cover is in zinc slate. This new casino projects 10 meters from the extended line of the facade of the Oppenheim house (block 15) and rests on a masonry base (AD Somme, 99 O 2594). In 1890, the central body included the performance hall as well as a location for the orchestra, a room for small horses and a coffee room in the left pavilion, a conversation room and a reading room in the pavilion of law.

In 1897, the casino scene was enlarged by the architect Edouard Boeuf, for a price of 1,000 francs. In 1907, a covered and glazed terrace was added on the side facades and on the front facade, on the plans of the architects Dupont and Lasnel, installed respectively in Mers-les-Bains and Eu. This gallery receives a café and a track of ‘ music hall’ with orchestra. At that time, the Grand Salon was transformed into a theater. In 1911, a rental lease was signed with Magherini (owner residing in Paris) until 1922, when we learn that the building consists of: a large main building in the beach esplanade composed of a basement -ground and a ground floor with glazed terrace; the basement is intended to serve as a cellar and equipment shed. Magherini may assign part of it to his personal accommodation. The ground floor is divided into eight rooms including in the center the performance hall and the music hall. According to the Joanne guide of 1912, the curtain of the theater is painted by Chapron. The garden adjoining the casino extends to the main road. There are six tennis courts . . . Requisitioned by the German army during the Second World War, the casino was destroyed in September 1943 to facilitate the installation of artillery pieces
Région Hauts-de-France – Inventaire général.

Panathenaic Stadium, Athens


Athenes.
Le Stade II – Stadion II – The Stadium II.

On back:
Παναθηναϊκό Στάδιον
[Panathenaic Stadium]
1930s

Google Street View.

The Panathenaic Stadium or Kallimarmaro is a multi-purpose stadium in Athens, Greece. One of the main historic attractions of Athens, it is the only stadium in the world built entirely of marble. A stadium was built on the site of a simple racecourse by the Athenian statesman Lykourgos (Lycurgus) c. 330 BC, primarily for the Panathenaic Games. It was rebuilt in marble by Herodes Atticus, an Athenian Roman senator, by 144 AD and had a capacity of 50,000 seats. After the rise of Christianity in the 4th century it was largely abandoned. The stadium was excavated in 1869 and hosted the Zappas Olympics in 1870 and 1875. After being refurbished, it hosted the opening and closing ceremonies of the first modern Olympics in 1896 and was the venue for 4 of the 9 contested sports.
Wikipedia.


Ruins of the Panathenaic Stadium, 1835 (from Wikimedia Commons

A few centuries later and after the site lay buried in soil and stripped of its valuable marble, the Panathenaic Stadium was set to start a new life as the idea of hosting the first modern Olympics in Athens took hold from the mid 1800’s.

When the French gathered a world congress in 1894 to discuss the concept of a modern Olympic Games, it was agreed that Paris would host it in 1900 to coincide with their World Fair of the same year. The Greek representative Dimitrios Vikelas saw an opportunity and suggested that Athens host the Olympics in 1896, but did so without the consent of the Greek government. The world congress agreed but the problem for Vikelas was that Greece had declared bankruptcy a year earlier and the government could not fund an Olympic Games on Greek soil. Vikelas however was adamant that holding the first Olympic Games in Athens was an honour and something that Greece deserved. He gained support from Crown Prince Constantine and they devised a plan to privately fund the games by lobbying George Averoff, the wealthy merchant from Egypt and one of Greece’s largest benefactors. Averoff obliged and financed the construction of the Panathenaic Stadium, insisting it be built entirely of marble from Mt Penteli, as was used to construct the Acropolis.

The project moved ahead at a furious pace and although not without complication (bad weather delayed the excavation of all the marble required to complete the stadium) the new stadium was ready in time to host the first modern Olympic Games in March 1896. Greek athlete Spyridon Louis won the Marathon race, bringing a whole new level of joy to the country. Whilst Greece of the 1890’s was still trying to evolve following the aftermath of 400 years of Turkish occupation, Athens had taken a major step forward, re-introducing Greece back into the fold of Europe.
Why Athens

Cathedral ruins & tennis courts, Tartu, Estonia


TARTU. Doomevaremed
DORPAT. Domruine
[Toom ruins]
1920s

Google Street View.

Older images on Wikimedia Commons.

Tartu Cathedral, located on the beautiful Toome Hill, is one of the largest churches in Estonia. It is also the only mediaeval church with two spires in Estonia. The construction of the church started in the 13th century and the church was fully completed in the beginning of the 16th century. The spires were the last things to be finished. The church was destroyed in the Livonian War and since then, it has not operated as a church. The ruins of the Tartu Cathedral are one of the most prominent examples of brick-Gothic buildings in Old Livonia.
Visit Estonia

The construction of the Gothic cathedral on the north side of the cathedral hill was probably begun in the second half of the 13th century. It was surrounded by a graveyard and houses for the members of the cathedral chapter. The cathedral was dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul, who were also the patron saints of the city. It was the seat of the Bishopric of Dorpat, and one of the largest religious buildings of Eastern Europe. The church was originally planned as a basilica, but the later addition of the three-aisled quire gave it the character of a hall church. The quire (in an early form) and nave were already in use by 1299. About 1470 the high quire with its pillars and arches was completed in Brick Gothic style.The cathedral was completed at the end of the 15th century with the building of the two massive fortress-like towers, originally 66 meters high, on either side of the west front. A wall separated the cathedral grounds and the bishop’s fortified residence from the lower town.

In the mid-1520s the Reformation reached Tartu. On 10 January 1525 the cathedral was badly damaged by Protestant iconoclasts, after which it fell increasingly into decay. After the deportation to Russia of the last Roman Catholic Bishop of Dorpat, Hermann Wesel (bishop from 1554 to 1558; died 1563), the cathedral church was abandoned. During the Livonian War (1558–1583) Russian troops devastated the city. When in 1582 the city fell to the Poles, the new Roman Catholic rulers planned to rebuild the cathedral, but the plans were abandoned because of the ensuing Polish-Swedish War (1600–1611). A fire in 1624 compounded the damage.
Wikipedia.


From Wikimedia Commons

In 1889–1979, there used to be a water tower on top of the northern tower of Tartu Cathedral. Over the years, the water tower was expanded when needed and reconstructions were made until its wooden structure was destroyed in the 1979 fire. As there was no central water supply system in Tartu before 1929, the water used on Toome Hill was fetched from the nearby river Emajõgi. In the second half of the 19th century, the water quality no longer fulfilled the needs of the clinics situated on the hill, and the university built a water system to supply the buildings with ground water. Reinhold Guleke, the university’s architect at the time, found the cathedral’s northern tower as the most suitable place for the required water tank and, in 1889, designed a wooden pavilion in Gothic style around the reservoir
The Secret Places of Toome Hill

Tennis, Deauville, France


DEAUVILLE – PLAGE FLEURIE – Les Tennis vus vers les Jetées
(Tennis looking towards the piers)
c.1940 but from an earlier photo
Publisher: Compagnie Alsacienne des Arts Photomécaniques Strasbourg

Google Maps.

Deauville was conceived with tourists in mind. It emerged from the sand dunes in the 1860s, thanks to the vision of one Dr Joseph Olliffe and his close friend, Emperor Napoleon III’s half-brother, the Duke de Morny. At the end of the 1850s, only marshes lay between the sea and small hillside village here. Dr Olliffe convinced wealthy backers to invest in a major scheme to drain the marshes and create a seaside resort from nothing. The resort was designed by architect Desle-François Breney, inspired by Baron Haussmann’s redevelopment of Paris. Aided by an all-important, brand-new railway line, the resort came into full bloom within just four years. Grand hotels built in the Anglo-Norman timber-frame style, smart bathing facilities and a stylish racecourse catered to elegant Parisians.
Normandie Tourism

Allentown Fair, Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA


4443 JUDGES STAND, ALLENTOWN, PA. FAIR.
COPYRIGHT 1905, SHAFERS BOOK STORE, ALLENTOWN, PA

Google Maps

The Lehigh County Agricultural Society held the first fair from October 6 to October 8, 1852, on Livingston’s Lawn, a 5-acre (20,000 m2) plot located east of Fourth Street, between Walnut and Union Streets, in Allentown. The initial fair was so successful that in 1853 the Society undertook the purchase of a larger plot of land, north of Liberty Street and between Fifth and Sixth Streets, on which ticket offices and a two-story exhibition hall were built.

Throughout the 1870s and 1880s, the popularity of the Allentown Fair continued to grow. However, increased attendance led to dissatisfaction regarding the fairground’s size, facilities, short race track and small grandstand. In 1889, the Lehigh County Agricultural Society purchased a plot of land on Seventeenth Street, between Chew and Liberty Streets, to serve as the new fairgrounds.One of the primary features of the new location was a new half-mile race track, with grandstands capable of seating 2,500.

From its earliest days, horse racing was a popular event at the Allentown Fair. In 1902, the fair’s half-mile track was regarded as “one of the finest in the country.” In 1905, racehorse Dan Patch set a record of 2:01 on the half-mile track. In 1908, a new grandstand was built at the Allentown Fairgrounds that increased seating capacity from 2,500 to 10,000. As of 2009, this structure remains in use as the Fairgrounds’ grandstand.

Wikipedia

1900 Advertisement for fair, showing track

Official site

Ball game, Place Verte, Charleroi, Belgium


Charleroi. Place du Sud. Le Jeu de Balle.
Publisher: Nels (Ernest Thill)

Street View (approximately)

History & Heritage of Charleroi: Place Verte (in French, translated)
Wikipedia: Balle pelote (in French, translated)

The Balle pelote is a team sport between two teams of five players on a called ground ballodrome. It is a game of gain-ground which takes place in the part West of Belgium, in the provinces of the Walloon Brabant, the Hainaut, Namur and in the western part of Flanders, but also in France, in valley of Sambre and the Inhabitant of Valenciennes.
Wikiversity