Milk seller & dog cart, Belgium


Laitière flamande – Vlaamsche melkboerin
[Flemish milkmaid[
Postmarked 1932

The milkman is almost unknown in Belgium, and except for a few boys and lads who accompany their mothers or elder sisters, all the sellers and carriers of milk ara women, who go round with their little carts and the brightly-polished copper or brass milkcans which are so well-known to all tourists. A word may well be said regarding the excellent management of the Belgian dairy farms, and of the milk supply. Inspections of the milkcarts and the milk are frequently held in most of the large towns for the purpose of ascertaining whether the many regulations that exist for the proper conduct of the business are being duly carried out. Not only is the milk itself carefully tested, but the cans are examined to see that they are thoroughly clean, and in every respect in a state of good repair. The condition of the dogs and the harness by which they are attached to the carts also comes in for inspection, lest the former should not have been properly fed, and the latter should in any way chafe or gall the animals.

Whatever one may think of the employment of dogs for the purpose of traction of milk and other small carts (and, of course, many humanitarians are strongly opposed to the custom), there can be no doubt that as a general rule the aninmls are well and kindly treated, and their comfort is wel) looked after by the authorities. Of recent years the owners of each cart have been obliged to provide a small piece of carpet or sacking for the dog to lie upon when resting, and also a drinking bowl.
The Catholic Press, 19 November 1914

Christmas Day Procession, Bethlehem


Bethlehém. Le jour de Noël – Christmas Day – La Fiesta de Navidad en Belén – La Festa della nascità a Betlem
[Bethlehem. Christmas Day]

A horizontal postcard depicting the area of the ceremony infront of the Church of the Nativity on Christmas day. It descrobes the procession with the cross to the Church of the Nativity. In the center a priest with white cape, holding a big cross. On both sides two lines of clergy men, also in white capes. (The capes above black cloaks.) This procession is in a big crowd of people, and also on the roofs around. The clothing looks like an arab clothing – colored cloaks, turbans, and so forth, and also western people with suits. On the side we can wee horses and camels. The point of view for this picture is from the Church of the Nativity to its plaza.
National Library of Israel

The Square is flanked by two other major attractions – the Church of St Catherine and the Church of Nativity. Manger Square takes its name from the adjacent Church of the Nativity that enshrines the Grotto the Nativity (the “manger”) where Jesus was born although the square itself is not mentioned in the Bible. As the heart of Bethlehem’s Old City Manger Square is the center for all tourist activity and the starting point of most Bethlehem tours. Manger Square is also the site of many events throughout the year. Flanking the Square are the 4th century Church of Nativity; Church of St. Catherine; the Mosque of Omar; Bethlehem Municipality building; souvenir stores and the Bethlehem Peace Center. During the Ottoman-era Manger Square was an open space used as a fresh produce and livestock market. In 1929 the market was moved to a new location in the Old City.
BeinHarim Tours

Frühlingstraße, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany


Garmisch – Frühlingsstrasse
Publisher: Franz Hayer

Garmisch-Partenkirchen is a ski town in Bavaria, southern Germany. It is the seat of government of the district of Garmisch-Partenkirchen (abbreviated GAP), in the Oberbayern region, which borders Austria. Nearby is Germany’s highest mountain, Zugspitze, at 2,962 metres (9,718 ft) above sea level. . . . Garmisch and Partenkirchen remained separate until their respective mayors were forced by Adolf Hitler to combine the two market towns on 1 January 1935[3] in anticipation of the 1936 Winter Olympic Games. Today, the united town is casually (but incorrectly) referred to as Garmisch, much to the dismay of Partenkirchen’s residents. Most visitors will notice the slightly more modern feel of Garmisch while the fresco-filled, cobblestoned streets of Partenkirchen have a generally more historic appearance.
Wikipedia.


View from Frühlingstraße, 2018 (by Friedrich-Karl Mohr, Wikimedia Commons)

Following your curiosity, you stroll along the famous Frühlingstraße. Everything around you is so picturesque it seems as if time had stopped. Balconies adorned with beautiful flowers, houses built primarily in the 18th century … Wherever you look, you see colourful Lüftlmalerei mural paintings on the facades. These artistic creations frame the historic district of Garmisch like the open pages of a picture book. Their stories tell of piety, names and professions, hopes and fears of the people. Originally, the street was a rural alpine settlement. Today, it attracts visitors from all over the world. A highlight in historic Garmisch that you should definitely see!
Garmisch Partenkirchen

Chinese Telephone Excahgne, San Francisco, USA


Interior Chinese Telephone Excahgne, Chinatown, San Francisco, Calif.
On the back:
CHINATOWN’S TELEPHNE EXCHANGE BUILDING
San Franciscos’s quaint Chinatown Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co. building was erected in 1909 to conform with Chinese architectural traditions. It hours what is believe to be the only Chinese Telephone exchange outside of China itself.
1940s
Publisher: Stanley A. Plitz Company, San Francisco (1930s-1950s)

Google Street View.

In 1891, the first public telephone pay station was installed in Chinatown. In 1894, a small switchboard was set up to serve subscribers to the telephone system. Since people were often asked for by name rather than by number, telephone operators memorized and knew each subscriber by name. This made telephone numbers unnecessary. The Chinatown community felt it was rude to refer to people by numbers. Operators also knew the address and occupations of subscribers so they could distinguish between two people with the same name. In addition, they had to speak five Chinese dialects and English.

Although the offices of the exchange were destroyed by the 1906 earthquake, they were rebuilt afterwards, and remained in operation until 1949. The exchange was closed in 1949, when technology changed from switchboard-operator system to rotary-dial telephones. The Bank of Canton bought and restored the building in 1960.
Chinatown, San Franciso

One of the most Interesting features of the rebuilding of San Francisco’s famed Chinatown is the new telephone exchange building to handle’ tho largo -number of calls from that quarter. Tho building is designed on Oriental lines, and when completed will be ornamented with dragons and other symbolical Chinese characters. The Chinese are great users of the telephone. and their language is cumbersome, and they would rather talk over the phone than write letters. The. operators will be Chinese boys, Chinese girls being at a premium.
[Sydney] Sunday Times, 26 September 1909

The telephone exchange in Chinatown, San Francisco, is unique, being strikingly Oriental in both its exterior and interior details, and operated wholly by Chinese. The building has three pagodas, giving it the appearance of the hone of Chinaman of rank, and aside from the sign above the door and the telephone apparatus within, is entirely Chinese. The manager of the exchange is an American-born Chinaman and the switchboard operators are chine boys and girls. The exchanges now take care of 800 subscribers’ lines. The Chinese part of the San Francisco telephone directory is arranged by names of streets, instead of by numbers, and a caller gives the name of the firm or individual he wishes to reach.
[Sydney] Globe, 11 January 1913

Just around the corner from Grant at Washington was the venerable Chinese Telephone Exchange at 743 Washington (map). It opened in 1901 at which time, pre dialling, the operators had to know all of the Chinatown customers by name and address because it was considered rude to refer to a person by number. Each operator also had to speak the many dialects of Chinese spoken by the residents. It was no surprise perhaps that the original male operators were soon replaced by women, on account of their “good temper”.
Reel SF (has more pictures)