Grosser Garten, Dresden, Germany


Palais (Altertums-Museum)
Dresden – Königl Grosser Garten
Palais-Teich
1910s
Publisher: Rudolf Brauneis, Dresden

Google Street View

The Großer Garten is a Baroque style park in central Dresden. It is rectangular in shape and covers about 1.8 km². Originally established in 1676 on the orders of John George III, Elector of Saxony, it has been a public garden since 1814. Pathways and avenues are arranged symmetrically throughout the park. The Sommerpalais, a small Lustschloss is at the center of the park.Ori ginally established outside the old walls of the city, the park was surrounded by urban areas by the second half of the 19th century. Dresden Zoo and Dresden Botanical Garden were added late in the 19th century.
Wikipedia.

The most impressive park in the region, the Grand Garden, is located at the heart of the Saxon capital. The 147-hectare garden, inspired by its French counterparts, was commissioned by Elector John George III in 1678. The two main avenues converge at the Palace that is now used as a venue for festivals and exhibitions. The Palace is surrounded by the baroque section of the garden. The remaining part is designed as an English landscape park with winding paths, small forests and bodies of water.
Grosser Garten Dresden


“Plan des Großen Gartens von 1850”,(from Wikimedia Commons).

Zoo, Hobart, Australia


Peacocks at Zoological Gardens, Hobart, Tasmania
c.1930
Publisher: Valentine & Son Publishinh Co., Melbourne, Sydney & Brisbane

The zoo was first established as a private collection in a garden in Sandy Bay that the owner, Mary Roberts, opened to the public. When she died in 1921, the zoo was gifted to the city, and moved to this site on the Domain, where it was opened two years later. You can read about that here. . . . These gates were erected a few years back. They say interesting things like: “The Beaumaris Zoo opened here in 1923. In its early years it was a popular outing for the people of Hobart, but in the 1930s, the Great Depression led to falling attendance and rising financial losses. The zoo closed in 1937. In 1942, the Royal Australian Navy converted the site in to a fuel oil storage depot. It remained in use until as recently as the 1990s, when the four storage tanks were removed.”
A Visit to the Zoo (more pictures)

Mrs Roberts owned and operated the zoo until her death in 1921. The Roberts family then gifted the zoological collection to the Hobart City Council and, with a subsidy from the Tasmanian State Government, the zoo was moved to the Queens Domain. With sweeping views of the Derwent, the site underwent a restoration to house more than 100 animals and 220 birds and was opened in 1923. Elephants, bears, tigers, eagles, zebras, ducks, rabbits and spider monkeys featured as attractions. But the zoo is most famous for being home to just one animal. The last captive thylacine nicknamed “Benjamin” was trapped in the Florentine Valley, near Mt Field in 1933 and sent to the Hobart Zoo where it lived for three years.
The Hobart

MOVING A ZOO : PROBLEM FOR HOBART COUNCIL.
The Beaumaris Zoo at Hobart has been closed, but the evacuation of the animals and birds is no small problem. The polar bears, particularly, are determined not to be disturbed, and to date it has been found impossible to ensnare them for shipment to the Wellington (N.Z.) Zoological Gardens for which they have been purchased. It is a condition of sale that before they are taken delivery of the Hobart City Council must crate them. The bears have other ideas, and all attempts to trap them have failed. Different methods have been tried, with the object of decoying them into the den of their pit, but they are cunningly suspicious. No longer do they sleep in the den. For a time they were placed on reduced rations, and then a tempting meal was placed in a corner of the den. The male bear, with remarkable cunning, managed to reach the food with his front paw, and dragged it into the open, where it was devoured by the pair. There is a likelihood of the council seeking the assistance of the Melbourne Zoo authorities to capture the bears. A pair of Tasmanian devils has been sold to a private zoo in Brisbane.

Daily Examiner, 19 November 1937

Storks on roof, Ribe, Denmark


Storkerede i Ribe
(Storks in Ribe)
Publisher: I. Lerche-Simonsen, Gaveboden, Ribe

The stork has for centuries been part of Ribe, and it means a lot to the people of Ribe, which reflects in frequent use of the stork in fairytales, myths, warnings, art, medias and as a souvenir. During summer the nests on top of the town roofs are full of storks and the large number of storks has given Ribe the name ”Town of Storks”.

The stork has been of great importance to many generations of people in Ribe and has spread joy and pride with its arrival every spring. Even though the stork does not visit every year anymore, this big white bird with red legs and beak is still an important part of Ribe. Ribe was earlier known as ”Town of Storks”, and the town has been quite successful in marketing this label. In the 1930’s there were most storks in, from 17 pairs in 1931 to 34 pairs in 1939. And that was the time, when Ribe got its byname. It was truly an impressive sight with storks all over Ribe, and during the best years, around 150 storks gathered at Hovedengen by the end of August, before they started their 12.000 km long migration to South Africa.
Ribe 1300

Lake, St Leger Thermal Spa, Pougues-les-Eaux, France


Pougues-les-Eaux (Nièvre) – Le Lac
c.1910
Pubilsher: Thibault

A drive of a few minutes had landed us in the heart of this little Paradise, baths and Casino standing in the midst of park-like grounds. Apparently Pougues, that is to say, the Pougues-les-Eaux of later days, has been cut out of natural woodland, the Casino gardens and its surroundings being rich in forest trees of superb growth and great variety. The wealth of foliage gives this new fashionable little watering-place an enticingly rural appearance, nor is the attraction of water wholly wanting. . . . A pretty little lake, animated with swans, varies the woodland scenery, and tropical birds in an aviary lend brilliant bits of colour. The usual accessories of a health resort are, of course, here—reading room, concert hall, theatre, and other attractions, rapidly turning the place into a lesser Vichy. The number and magnificence of the hotels, the villas and cottages, that have sprung up on every side, bespeak the popularity of Pougues-les-Eaux, as it is now styled, the surname adding more dignity than harmoniousness.
“East of Paris: Sketches in the Gâtinais, Bourbonnais, and Champagne”, Matilda Betham-Edwards (1902), p. 50

Pougues les Eaux is a town in the Center of France with a Spa and Gambling heritage. Although the Health Spa stopped in 1970, it was known for it’s miraculous water and gambling Casino since the renaissance.
Deserted Health Spa and Casino – Pougues les Eaux

Site is now Parc Saint Léger – Contemporary Art Center, which is here.