Ballroom Garden, Governor’s Palace, Williamsburg, USA


Ballroom Garden, Governor’s Palace, Williamsburg, Virginia
On back:
In 1724, the Reverend Hugh Jones wrote of the Governor’s Palace <<a magnificent Structure, built at the public Expense, finished and beautified with Gates, fine Gardens, Offices, Walks, a fine Canal, Orchards &c.>> The Palace, its dependencies, and gardens have been reconstructed to their original appearance
1950s
Publisher: Colonial Williamsburg, Indianopolis “Made in Switzerland by Atelier Graphique H. Vontobel, Feldmeilen. Imported exclusively by Runca Import Company, Rutherfordton N.C.. USA”

Google Maps.

An official Colonial Williamsburg postcard illustrated with a view looking down from the Governor’s Palace cupola on the formal garden behind the Ballroom Wing. The card offers a view of the formal gardens behind the Governor’s Palace, flanking one side of the Ballroom Wing. These gardens, designed by Arthur Shurcliff, include boxwood parterres and one dozen large cylindrical shrubs known as the Twelve Apostles, a feature often appearing in eighteenth-century English gardens. Near the top of the photo, a pleached hornbeam arbor is visible to the left. Just beyond the arbor is a small structure built into the garden wall that served as a privy (necessary).
John D. Rockefeller Jr. Library, Colonial Willamsburg Foundation

The Governor’s Palace in Williamsburg, Virginia, was the official residence of the Royal Governors of the Colony of Virginia. It was also a home for two of Virginia’s post-colonial governors, Patrick Henry and Thomas Jefferson, until the capital was moved to Richmond in 1780, and with it the Governor’s residence. The main house burned down in 1781, though the outbuildings survived for some time after. . . . Through the efforts of Reverend Dr. W.A.R. Goodwin, rector of Bruton Parish Churc h and philanthropist John D. Rockefeller Jr., whose family provided major funding, the elaborate and ornate palace was carefully recreated in the early 20th century.The reconstruction was based on numerous surviving pieces of evidence. Archaeological excavations of the site revealed the original foundations and cellar, together with architectural remnants that had fallen in during the fire. Jefferson’s drawings and plans from his proposed renovation have survived, conveying the interior plan. In 1929, while the project was already in planning, a copperplate engraving nicknamed the Bodleian Plate was discovered in England’s Bodleian Library. The plate included renderings c. 1740 of the exterior of the palace, along with the Capitol and the Wren Building. Additional evidence included original artifacts and Virginia General Assembly records. The house, outbuildings, and gardens opened as an exhibition on April 23, 1934.
Wikipedia.

Mount Vernon, USA


Geo. Washington’s House at Mount Vernon.
c.1910
Publisher: Arthur Capper, Topeka

Google Maps (location).

Virtual Tour

Mount Vernon is an American landmark and former plantation of George Washington, the first President of the United States, and his wife, Martha. The estate is on the banks of the Potomac River in Fairfax County, Virginia. It is located south of Washington, D.C. and Alexandria, Virginia and is across the river from Prince George’s County, Maryland. The Washington family acquired land in the area in 1674. Around 1734, the family embarked on an expansion of its estate that continued under George Washington, who began leasing the estate in 1754 before becoming its sole owner in 1761. The mansion was built of wood in a loose Palladian style; the original house was built by George Washington’s father Augustine, around 1734. George Washington expanded the house twice, once in the late 1750s and again in the 1770s. It remained Washington’s home for the rest of his life. Following his death in 1799, under the ownership of several successive generations of the family, the estate progressively declined as revenues were insufficient to maintain it adequately. In 1858, the house’s historical importance was recognized and it was saved from ruin by the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association; this philanthropic organization acquired it together with part of the Washington property estate.
Wikipedia.


Main Hall, Mt Vernon Mansion, VA.
On back:
MAIN HALL, MOUNT VERNON MANSION, VA.
This is the central hall of Washington Mansion at Mt. Vernon. It is a beautiful example of the architecture of Colonial days.

Publisher: B.S. Reynolds, Washington, D.C. 1902-1948

The central passage is the entryway into the Washingtons’ home, the place where visitors who came by carriage through the west front drive were greeted. Entertaining also occurred in the central passage, particularly during hot Virginia summers when the family gathered here to enjoy breezes from the open doorways.
George Washington’s Mount Vernon

Today meticulously restored to its appearance in 1799, the mansion preserves the legacy of this great American. Three rooms are on either side of the wide central hall on the first floor. The front parlor, music room, and the grand two-story large dining room are located north of the center hall. A small dining room, a first floor bedchamber, and Washington’s private study are on the south side of the house. The second floor contains six bedrooms, including the master bedroom, with its narrow staircase leading directly to Washington’s study below. The third floor has more bedchambers, including the small garret chamber to which Martha Washington retreated after her husband’s death.
National Parks Service


West Parlor, Mount Vernon, VA.
On back:
WEST PARLOR, MT. VERNON, VA.
In the West Parlor much of the furnishing was here in Washington’s day. The rug here was made by order of Louis XVi for Washington. It is of a dark green ground; in the center is the America eagle surrounded with stars.

1920s
Publisher: B.S. Reynolds, Washington, D.C. 1902-1948

Before the New Room was completed, Washington considered the front parlor to be “the best place in my House.” This elegant room was a public space where visitors enjoyed the Washington family’s company. Tea and coffee were customarily served here during the winter and on rainy days, and the household gathered here in the evenings to read, discuss the latest political news, and play games.
George Washington’s Mount Vernon

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Old St. John’s Church, Richmond, Virginia


Old St. John’s Church Interior, Richmond, Va.
In 1775 a convention was held in this historic church to deliberate upon the oppressive measures adopted by the British Government for enforcing the collection of taxes levied upon the Colonies. Many members of the convention hesitated to commit Virginia to any act of resistance, but Patrick Henry though only 39 years old, flashed the electric spark which exploded with fiery eloquence, “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of the chains of slavery? Forbid it Almighty God I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty or give me death.”

During the delivery of this immortal speech Henry stood in pew 72, now marked by white tablet shown in this view.

Postmarked 1946

Street View