The Queen’s Hamlet, Versailles, France

Master post for Versailles


VERSAILLES. Parc du Petit-Trianon. Le Presbytère.
c.1910
Publisher: Neurdein Studio

The Hameau de la Reine (The Queen’s Hamlet) is a rustic retreat in the park of the Château de Versailles built for Marie Antoinette in 1783 near the Petit Trianon in Yvelines, France. It served as a private meeting place for the Queen and her closest friends; a place of leisure. Designed by the Queen’s favoured architect, Richard Mique with the help of the painter Hubert Robert, it contained a meadowland with a lake and various buildings in a rustic or vernacular style, inspired by Norman or Flemish design, situated around an irregular pond fed by a stream that turned a mill wheel.
Wikipedia.

The Queen’s Hamlet, constructed between 1783 and 1786 under the supervision of Richard Mique, is an excellent example of the contemporary fascination with the charms of rural life. Inspired by the traditional rustic architecture of Normandy, this peculiar model village included a windmill and dairy, as well as a dining room, salon, billiard room and boudoir. Although it was reserved primarily for the education of her children, Marie-Antoinette also used the hamlet for promenades and hosting guests.
Chateau de Versailles

Petit Trianon, Versailles, France

Master post for Versailles


VERSAILLES. Palais du Petit-Trianon. Le grand Escalier
[Palace of the Petit Trianon. The grand Staircase.]
c.1910
Publisher: Neurdein Studio

In an attempt to gain some brief respite from courtly etiquette, the kings of Versailles built themselves more intimate spaces close to the main palace. Adjoining the Petit Parc, the estate of Trianon is home to the Grand Trianon and Petit Trianon palaces, as well as the Queen’s Hamlet and a variety of ornamental gardens. Construction on the estate began under Louis XIV, who had the Grand Trianon Palace built at the far end of the northern branch of the Grand Canal. The estate is perhaps most closely associated with Queen Marie-Antoinette. The wife of Louis XVI regularly sought refuge at the Petit Trianon, where she commissioned marvellous landscaped gardens centred around a hamlet of cottages built in the rustic style then in vogue.
Chateau de Versailles

The Petit Trianon was built on the site of a botanical garden developed about a decade earlier by Louis XV, within the grounds of the Grand Trianon, Louis XIV’s retreat from the Palace of Versailles to the southeast. It was designed by Ange-Jacques Gabriel by order of Louis XV for his long-term mistress, Madame de Pompadour, and was constructed between 1762 and 1768. Madame de Pompadour died four years before its completion, and the Petit Trianon was subsequently occupied by her successor, Madame du Barry. Upon his accession to the throne in 1774, the 20-year-old Louis XVI gave the château and its surrounding park to his 19-year-old Queen Marie Antoinette for her exclusive use and enjoyment.

The Petit Trianon is a celebrated example of the transition from the Rococo style of the earlier part of the 18th century to the more sober and refined Neoclassical style of the 1760s and onward. Essentially an exercise on a cube, the Petit Trianon attracts interest by virtue of its four facades, each thoughtfully designed according to that part of the estate it would face. The Corinthian order predominates, with two freestanding and two engaged columns on the side of the formal French garden, and pilasters facing both the courtyard and the area once occupied by Louis XV’s greenhouses.
Wikipedia.

Gardens, Palace of Versailles, France

Master post for Versailles


Versailles. – Ensemble du Château. Parterre d’Eau, un Dimanche de Grandes Eaux
c.1910

Situated above the Latona Fountain is the terrace of the château, known as the Parterre d’Eau. Forming a transitional element from the château to the gardens below and placed on the north-south axis of the gardens, the Parterre d’Eau provided a setting in which the imagery and symbolism of the decors of the grands appartements synthesized with the iconography of the gardens. In 1664, Louis XIV commissioned a series of statues intended to decorate the water feature of the Parterre d’Eau. The Grande Commande, as the commission is known, comprised twenty-four statues of the classic quaternities and four additional statues depicting abductions from the classic past.
Wikipedia


VERSAILLES. — Terrasse du Château (côté Jardin). — Terrace of the Castle (Garden side).
Only publisher details: Editions d’Art “LYS”, Versailles, 9 Rue Colbert

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Palace of Versailles: Grand Trianon

Master post for Versailles


Versailles. – Palais du Grand Trianon

Street view.
Floor plan 1714-5

The Grand Trianon was erected by Jules Hardouin-Mansart in 1687 on the site of the former ‘Porcelain Trianon’. Commissioned by Louis XIV in 1670 to get away from the arduous pomp of life in the court and to pursue his affair with Madame de Montespan, the Grand Trianon is perhaps the most refined architectural ensemble found on the royal estate of Versailles.
Website.

The Grand Trianon is a château (palace) situated in the northwestern part of the Domain of Versailles. It was built at the request of King Louis XIV of France (r. 1643–1715), as a retreat for himself and his maîtresse en titre of the time, the Marquise de Montespan (1640–1707), and as a place where he and invited guests could take light meals (collations) away from the strict étiquette of the Court.
Wikipedia.

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Temple of Love, Petit Trianon, Versailles, France

Master post for Versailles


VERSAILLES. — Hameau de Marie-Antoinette – Le Temple de l’Amour
Marie-Antoinette’s Hamlet – The Temple of Love.
Only publisher details: Editions d’Art “LYS”, Versailles, 9 Rue Colbert

This Temple of Love, which Marie-Antoinette could see from her room in the Petit Trianon, was erected by Richard Mique in 1778 in a neo-classical style. Fully decorated in marble, this precious building is especially remarkable for the quality of the sculptures by Deschamps which ornament the Corinthian capitals, the friezes and the inside of the dome.
Chateau of Versailles


 Le Temple de l’Amour — Temple of Love
Publisher: E. Papeghin, Paris


On back:
VERSAILLES (S.-et-O.)
416- Trianaon – Le Temple de l’Amour

Postmarked: 1955
Only publisher details: Editions d’Art A.P., 11 Rue Colbert, Versailles

Town Hall, Versailles, France


Versailles — L’Hôtel de Ville | The Town-Hall.
c.1910
Publisher: L. Ragon

Google Street View.

The Versailles City Hall, is a witness of the history of Versailles. This property of a natural daughters of Louis XIV came under Louis XV to the Grand Master of the Royal Household who redesigned and rebuilt in 1900. The Versailles Hotel de Ville (city hall) consists of two distinct parts: along the rue du Général de Gaulle, facing the palace, sits a low building preceded by a wide staircase. This is the first city hall, established in 1790 in the old hotel de Conti. This property, belonging to one Louis XIV’s illegitimate daughters, passed under Louis XV to the Grand Master of the king’s household, who had it refurbished. Paneling from this period is preserved in the modern part of the building. The house, facing the avenue de Paris, is an imposing neo-Louis XIII building designed by H. Legrand, dating from 1897-1900.
Versailles Tourisme

The Versailles City Hall (Hôtel de Ville) that you will see today isn’t very old, but the original building dated back to the late 17th century and the “new” building has kept much of the early architecture. The original building was constructed in 1670 for the Marquis de Bellefonds, Bernadin Gigault. It was a beautiful chateau with grounds stretching to the edge of the gardens of the palace. . . . The princess [Marie-Ann] later sold the chateau to a speculator who stripped the building of its furniture and finery. In 1723 Louis 15th bought it for his Prime Minister, Louis-Hénri de Bourbon. He had it renovated and opened the grounds to the public giving them easier access between the Saint Louis and Notre Dame districts. During the French Revolution it became the “temporary” seat of the Town Council. In 1821 they were still there and the chateau became the official Hôtel de Ville. In 1899 the building was too small and the Mayor Edouard Lefbvre had it pulled down and commissioned Hénri le Grand to build the new City Hall, based on plans of the chateau.
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