Lambaesis/Tazoult, Algeria


RUINES ROMAINS DE LAMBESE. — Voie ouest
Dated 1916
Publisher: Neurden & Co

Lambaesa was founded by the Roman military. The camp of the third legion (Legio III Augusta), to which it owes its origin, appears to have been established between AD 123–129, in the time of Roman emperor Hadrian, whose address to his soldiers was found inscribed on a pillar in a second camp to the west of the great camp still extant. However, other evidence suggests it was formed during the Punic Wars. The town is built 622 m above sea level in the plain and on the spurs of the Djebel Asker.
By AD 166 mention is made of the decurions of a vicus, 10 curiae of which are known by name; and the vicus became a municipium probably at the time when it was made the capital of the newly founded province of Numidia. Lambaesis was populated mainly by Romanized Berbers and by some Roman colonists with their descendants: Latin was the official and commonly used language (even if local Berbers spoke their own language mixed with Latinisms).
Wikipedia.

Lambaesis once served as the capital of Roman Numidia and was, for a long time, the partner and sometime rival of nearby Timgad. . . . Lambaesis consisted of a military camp – not unlike a modern military base, with barracks, armoury, hospital and so on – surrounded by a wall and watchtowers, and civilian camps outside the perimeter.
Lonely Planet

Eleven km SE of Batna and 140 km from Constantine, the settlement was the headquarters of the legate of the Third Augustan Legion from the 2d c. A.D. When the province of Numidia was officially created in 197-198, it became the capital. . . . This camp is scarcely visible except by aerial photography. It has been wrongly called the “camp of the auxiliaries.” Probably it was a camp built by the soldiers for the imperial visit. We know now that an earlier camp, dating to A.D. 81, existed in the district called the civilian town, S of the modern built-up area. The N district was mainly occupied by the large camp (500 x 420 m). This camp was greatly damaged when in 1851 a penitentiary was built in the SW part; the village built later on was also constructed on the ruins.
The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites


LAMBESE. – La Voie et la Porte Nord.
c.1910
Publisher: Ley & Fils

Google Street VIew (approximate)

Two streets, one running E-W, the other N-S, divided the large camp into four parts of unequal size. At the intersection is a rectangular building (36.6 x 23 m) called the praetorium. It forms a sort of quadruple arch of triumph. On the outside it is adorned with pilasters and Corinthian columns; it has large arched openings. South of this building extended a flagged court (65 x 37 m) surrounded on three sides by a portico onto which a series of rooms opened.
The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites

On level ground about two-thirds of a mile from the centre of the ancient town stands the camp, its site now partly occupied by the penitentiary and its gardens. It measures 1,640 feet (500 m) by 1,476 feet (450 m), and in the middle rise the ruins of a building commonly called, but incorrectly, the praetorium. This noble building, which dates from 268, is 92 feet (28 m) long by 66 feet (20 m) broad and 49 feet (15 m) high; its southern façade has a splendid peristyle half the height of the wall, consisting of a front row of massive Ionic columns and an engaged row of Corinthian pilasters.
Wikipedia.

Read more

Monkey, Hôtel Ruisseau Des Singes, Chiffa, Algeria


GORGES DE LA CHIFFA. – Chalet-Hotel du Ruisseau des Singes  – Amusement des Visiteurs
(Hotel of the River of Moneys – Entertainment for visitors)
Publisher: Photo Albert

Google Maps (location)

The charming mountain village of Chréa was the first ski resort created by the French in Algeria. It quickly became a famous resort. Its small wooden chalets almost reminded us of the Vosges or the Jura. The snow cover was capricious and the gradient was slight, but you could still enjoy skiing in winter. Nowadays, nobody skis on the spot during the winter season but the snowy landscapes remain grandiose. In summer, it is pleasant to go there to find some coolness and avoid the torrid heat of the Mitidja. At the site called “le Ruisseau des Singes” (because of the many monkeys that frequent the area and that you will see from the road), you will find a very pleasant hotel complex with cafeteria and restaurant.
Petit Futé Travel Guide: Chrea National Park

Gorges of Rhumel, Constantine, Algeria


CONSTANTINE. – Gorges du Rhummel. – Les Voutes Naturelles.
1910s
Publisher: Levy Sons & Co. (1895-1919)

Google Street View (general location)

Constantine – a city not so much built as draped, clinging to ravines and peaks that soar above the river Rhumel (Malek Haddad, Algerian poet born in 1927 in Constantine). Once known as Cirta, the capital of the Kingdom of Numidia more than 2000 years ago, the city was given its current name in 313AD by Emperor Constantine the Great. While it was at the crossroads of civilisation for centuries, it remains an unknown city to many. Constantine is renowned for its topography – a mountainous setting rising 649m above sea level. Over millennia the Oued Rhumel (Rhumel River) has carved deep ravines and gorges through the landscape, leaving rocky outcrops on which the city is built and creating a natural fortress that was easy to defend. Bridges connect the peaks and outcrops, creating spectacular vistas where the buildings seem to merge with the cliffs.
ASA Cultural Tours

Dar Hassan Pacha/Winter Palace, Algiers, Algeria

Master list for Algiers


ALGER.-Palais d’hiver. — Galerie Mauresque
c.1910

Google Maps (no street view).

Dar Hassan Pacha is an 18th-century palace located in the Casbah of Algiers, Algeria. It was built in 1791 and used to belong to Hassan III Pasha, who signed a treaty with the US September 5, 1795. After 1830, it became the winter residence of the Governor of Algiers, and as a consequence, it was completely remodelled in 1839, when the entrance has been changed and a new facade was created.
Wikipedia.

Hassan Pacha was the ruler of Algiers and a man with a sense of purpose – in 1795 he concluded a peace treaty with the fledgling USA guaranteeing their ships safe passage in Algiers’ waters. Before that, around 1791, he began work building his palace on the edge of the Casbah, but away from the waterside, which was vulnerable and damp in winter. When Algiers fell to the French the house was turned into the governor’s winter residence. Its facade was remodelled, and unlike most large houses here the Dar Hassan Pacha was given a European-style front, with rows of large windows and balconies and a grander entrance.
Lonely Planet

ArchNet

Hassan Pasha Mosque, Oran, Algeria


ORAN – Intérieur de la Mosquée
c.1910

Courtyard and ablutions fountain.

Archnet: images including plan of prayer hall

Possible location?

The Hassan Pasha Mosque, also referred to as the Pasha Mosque or the Grand Mosque, is a mosque located in Oran, Algeria. It was built in 1796 by order of Baba Hassan, Pasha of Algiers, in memory of the expulsion of the Spanish. During the French Invasion of Algiers in 1830, French soldiers would occupy the mosque during their invasion of Algeria as their living-quarters. 5 years after the French Invasion, in 1835, the building was established as a mosque and renovated three decades later. In 1952, the mosque was listed as a historic monument.
Wikipedia.

The Prefecture, Algiers, Algeria

Master list for Algiers

S. — ALGER. — La Préfecture

Google Maps

The Prefecture, also known as the Wilaya building, was built in 1904. The building’s architecture is a blend of a multitude of styles. The dominant style is Neo-Moorish colonial. The walls of the Prefecture are snow white, which makes it highly visible. The facade of the building has a variety of splendid engravings and ornaments. The pillars give the Prefecture a very aristocratic look. Architect Henri Petit designed the building.
GPSMyCity